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What is a market-based approach to water quality?

Last month, the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) released a joint letter encouraging market-based, collaborative approaches to reduce excess nutrients in waterways. But, few other details were offered on how to best take this approach.

There are three possible market-based strategies for water quality improvement: nutrient reduction exchange, wetland mitigation banking, and environmental impact bonds.

An ancient legal principle still impacts Nebraska’s landowners

Adverse possession is a common law principle that dates back to 2000 B.C. The legal principle was mentioned in 5,046 cases in the United States between 1960 and 2015. During the same time period, there were 176 cases in Nebraska that cited adverse possession.

Under the doctrine, individuals who have occupied a parcel of land for 10 years can claim ownership if they meet certain legal requirements. To claim adverse possession under current Nebraska law, the requirements are:

Justino farms by creating opportunities

Justino Borja’s tenacity grows from deep roots. He comes from Mexico, a family of farmers, and a history of working the land. No doubt, that’s where Justino developed his determination and his love for family and land.

Since he has been in the U.S., Justino has always wanted to have his own farm. At first, he had the support of his three brothers, but little by little he found himself alone in his desire to farm his own land.

Staff spotlight: Rebecca’s road to rural success

Rebecca White has gone above and beyond with her job duties and dedicated the last 30 years to helping Native communities in Nebraska.

Recently, the Plainview, Nebraska, native added her decades of commitment and experience to the Center for Rural Affairs team.

Hired as a Tribal projects manager, Rebecca works alongside the Omaha and Santee Sioux Tribes in the Center’s food systems projects.

Now is the time for the Legislature to step up on broadband

An overreliance on faulty data may be leaving thousands of rural Nebraska households out of the digital age. Twice per year, the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) collects broadband access data through Form 477 from internet service providers. This data has a host of problems and can severely overestimate broadband access.

Many Nebraskans are being left behind because of this inaccurate information. Meanwhile, state and local governments are using this information as a primary source to distribute their limited resources—something it was never intended to be used as.

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