Climate

Climate change presents a steep challenge for rural America. Fortunately, rural communities are full of people who are committed to addressing climate change. We strive to support a strong sense of stewardship by supporting common-sense actions to mitigate this global problem which can present dire local impacts for rural America.

Rural, small town, and tribal communities are already experiencing the impacts of climate change and are a critical part of any potential solution. We work alongside rural Americans, small business owners, farmers and ranchers, community leaders, and young people to advocate for measures that address climate change and create new opportunities in rural places.

As we work to reduce carbon emissions, we advocate for investments in renewable energy, more efficient use of energy in our daily lives, and agricultural practices which sequester carbon. Meanwhile, we assist in amplifying the voices of rural Americans so they are heard in national conversations about climate change.

Rural Americans are having the difficult conversations and committing to do their part in addressing climate change, and we’re proud to stand with them.

You can join our #2020ClimateCaucus, and view our climate resources page.

Climate Notes

 

Building Climate Resiliency

"Building Climate Resiliency" is a series of four fact sheets that focus on building rural resiliency in the face of climate change. These are a part of the Center for Rural Affairs' climate project focusing on elevating the stories of rural climate leaders.

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Red Fern Farm builds resiliency through diversification

Tom Wahl and Kathy Dice, owners of Red Fern Farm, have built resiliency in their operation to overcome challenging weather.

Nestled in a heavily wooded area just south of Grandview, Iowa, Red Fern Farm offers a unique experience for customers to harvest their own Iowa-grown fruits and nuts.

The owners grow a variety of fruit and nut trees—including chestnuts, persimmons, heartnut, pawpaw, and Asian pear. Their primary market is a “you pick” business throughout the summer, where customers schedule a time to pick from the trees and pay per pound harvested.

Top 5 of 2019: Iowa farmer shows conservation and economics go hand in hand

Countdown time! With less than one week remaining in 2019, a recap is in order. Starting today through the end of the year, we'll review the five best Center stories of the year, chosen by the most views on our website.

Number five features a piece authored by Kayla Bergman and Kate Hansen. They interview Mark Tjelmeland who has farmed alongside his wife near McCallsburg, Iowa, for almost four decades. Together, they prioritize our natural resources and climate through various conservation practices. The blog was posted in September.

Clara’s Garden shows that a sustainable floral business is possible

Being a florist focused on sustainability in the face of our changing climate may be difficult, but Mediapolis, Iowa, mother-daughter duo Meredith and Jen Hinson do just that.

Meredith began her floral career working for a local florist 15 years before opening her own shop—Clara’s Garden—in 2000. Jen joined the Clara’s Garden team when she moved back for the summer after teaching in Houston, Texas, for a few years.