Small Towns

Rural communities hold the keys to survival in their own hands. With help from policies that build on their strengths as desirable places to live and raise families, they can thrive.

Community Development

To thrive, rural communities must invest in themselves and their futures, including rural schools and rural leaders.

Community Food Systems

Local farmers markets, community gardens, and local and regional food systems provide fresh, healthy food for all and keep money circulating in the local economy.

Rural Groceries

Small towns across rural America are losing their grocery stores, and we’re working to help groceries stay around.

Small Towns Notes

 

Adverse to change: a modern look at adverse possession

Adverse possession is an ancient legal principle that has a counterintuitive outcome in practice. It seems to fly in the face of our deeply held views of property ownership in the United States. Because of this, it is often misunderstood by the general population.

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Map to Prosperity

Connectivity is the defining aspect of our 21st century economy. It determines the work we do, the markets we access, and our financial prospects, while also shaping our education, health care, and overall quality of life.

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Your rural voice: striking a property tax balance with LB 614

The Center for Rural Affairs agrees that property taxes are too high and local schools and government entities are forced to be too reliant on property taxes. This reliance upon property taxes for education and local government demands even the most comprehensive property tax relief plan receive careful scrutiny as these institutions underpin the existence of rural communities. Although we recognize that farmers and ranchers often bear the greatest tax burden, our mission is to support policy that builds strong rural communities and provides opportunity for all rural people. LB 614 achieves that policy goal.

Rural values amplified in Washington, D.C.

Our policy efforts speak rural values to the elected officials and government administrators in Washington, D.C. Since the 2018 farm bill passed in December, we followed progress on the shutdown, traveled to Washington, D.C., and fought for funding that supports our rural small businesses. Here’s a brief summary.