Clean Energy

Clean energy offers a significant opportunity to diversify the rural economy, create new opportunity and address the root cause of climate change.

Wind energy and other renewable energy will revitalize rural communities rich in energy resources. When the Nebraska legislature held a hearing on wind development, one group of citizens drove 400 miles to testify that for the first time in memory, there was renewed hope for the future of their community. The economics are clear.

To maximize the impact, there is a critical need for new and upgraded transmission capacity to unlock the renewable energy potential found in rural America. Both our economy and our future depend on moving power from the remote regions of the Great Plains and Upper Midwest to the demand centers that need it most.

Our goal is to better assist landowners and other rural stakeholders to ensure that clean energy transmission is built in an equitable, sustainable way - a way that works best for rural citizens and their communities. Those affected by new transmission will benefit from forming real partnerships with developers and those in the regulatory sphere, relationships that result in greater engagement in planning, new responsiveness to concerns and more equitable compensation models.

See our clean energy transmission database here. Learn about our work to replace coal fired energy with renewables (infographs to share!)

Clean Energy Notes

 

2019 Iowa Legislative Priorities

In 2017, we developed an active presence on Iowa state policy, which continues today. Our priority issues include clean energy and water quality. We collaborate with coalition partners, develop relationships with key legislators, and engage Iowa supporters.

Relevant developments concerning priority legislation will be shared via email. To sign up for updates, email info@cfra.org.

Wind energy yields tax revenue

Wind energy projects in North Dakota have generated millions of dollars in tax revenue for rural communities over the last several years. In 2015, the projects generated $1,126,934 in electric generation tax revenue, and, in 2016, they generated $7.7 million dollars in property tax revenue. This new revenue was used to fund schools, roads, and other essential services like fire and emergency medical services.

Wind projects generate more than energy

Many people wonder what their community will get out of wind development, and in South Dakota, wind projects have generated more than energy. Important tax revenue for local schools, roads, and more have come from these projects.

In South Dakota, contributions of the projects came through nameplate capacity and production taxes, providing a tool for localities to offset the need for higher taxes. The nameplate capacity tax is based on the total energy generation of the project while the production tax assesses the actual production of a wind energy system.