Clean Energy

Clean energy offers a significant opportunity to diversify the rural economy, create new opportunity and address the root cause of climate change.

Wind energy and other renewable energy will revitalize rural communities rich in energy resources. When the Nebraska legislature held a hearing on wind development, one group of citizens drove 400 miles to testify that for the first time in memory, there was renewed hope for the future of their community. The economics are clear.

To maximize the impact, there is a critical need for new and upgraded transmission capacity to unlock the renewable energy potential found in rural America. Both our economy and our future depend on moving power from the remote regions of the Great Plains and Upper Midwest to the demand centers that need it most.

Our goal is to better assist landowners and other rural stakeholders to ensure that clean energy transmission is built in an equitable, sustainable way - a way that works best for rural citizens and their communities. Those affected by new transmission will benefit from forming real partnerships with developers and those in the regulatory sphere, relationships that result in greater engagement in planning, new responsiveness to concerns and more equitable compensation models.

See our clean energy transmission database here. Learn about our work to replace coal fired energy with renewables (infographs to share!)


 

Clean Energy Notes

 

Electric and Magnetic Fields

The electric transmission grid is an essential piece of infrastructure. A robust transmission system is key to linking renewable energy generation from across the region to homes and businesses, while upgrades also
increase reliability of electric service. But, as the grid is updated, there are concerns about potential impacts to health and safety from electric transmission. One of the issues often mentioned is electric and magnetic fields (EMFs) emitted by transmission lines.

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Minnesota wind energy tax revenue

Wind farm development brings numerous economic benefits to the counties and local communities where the farms are located.

Among the perks are direct payments to landowners who host turbines and employment opportunities in the area during the construction and operation of a project. In some cases, operators may also provide payments to neighbors who are near development but do not host turbines, and some wind farms are developed by associations that distribute payments to members.

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Iowa should watch, learn from neighbors on clean energy

For decades, Iowa has rightfully taken pride in being a leader in clean energy nationally and in the Midwest. Iowa was the first state to establish a renewable portfolio standard in 1983. We produce some of the highest rates of wind energy per capita with roughly 37 percent of our electricity coming from wind.