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Recent posts by Anna Johnson

Public invited to comment on new Conservation Stewardship Program rule

Changes are coming to the nation’s largest conservation program and the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) is seeking public comments on a new rule.

On Nov. 12, the USDA’s Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS) announced changes to the Conservation Stewardship Program (CSP), which offers farmers and ranchers a valuable opportunity to build on and increase conservation on their operations.

The 2018 farm bill made a variety of changes to CSP, and this rule is the process where the USDA puts them into action. The changes include: 

Our recommendations to make EQIP more accessible and streamlined

Since 1973, the Center for Rural Affairs has advocated for conservation as a valuable tool for farmers and ranchers to establish and grow their operations, including supporting programs such as the Environmental Quality Incentives Program (EQIP) and the Conservation Stewardship Program (CSP).

With passage of the farm bill in December 2018, the Center for Rural Affairs’ attention turns to the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), which is responsible for enacting the farm bill.

Conservation for Rural Communities: Center for Rural Affairs Farm Bill Implementation Recommendations

The Center for Rural Affairs has been fighting for strong and healthy rural communities for several decades. Early in our history, we recognized that well-managed, diversified farming operations are key to rural community vitality. For example, diverse on-farm income streams offer economic resiliency. Crops and livestock managed together can cycle nutrients within the farm and build soil health and improve water quality. Healthy and profitable farms and ranches in turn help support rural businesses and communities.

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Crop insurance supports on-farm diversity

Farmers and ranchers have one thing in common: the need to manage risk, from weather, markets, or other forces. 

Crop insurance can be a useful tool for farmers and ranchers in managing risk. But, while crop insurance is readily available for major crops like corn and soybeans, many farmers and ranchers could benefit from learning about risk management options for more niche crops.

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