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Recent posts by Liz Daehnke

Staff spotlight: Preston appointed as interim Women's Business Center director

For nearly 20 years, Kim Preston has been part of the Center for Rural Affairs team. During that time, she has taken on different roles, and made each one her own.

In 1999, Preston started her career with the Center in the policy and research program. Fourteen years later, she was asked to become the administrative assistant for the small business program, Rural Enterprise Assistance Project (REAP). In five years, she has gained a broad knowledge of the loan making process, and has worked directly with technical assistance specialists providing services to clients.

Seiferts transition into ownership, extending life of business

Becoming a business owner can be a challenging process, especially if the fate lies on the shoulders of new owners. Family members of Lane and Melanie Seifert opened ABC Blinds & Shades in Scottsbluff, Nebraska, 15 years ago, and during the last two years, the Seiferts have taken over ownership of the custom window covering business and, within that time, made it their own.

Transmission line development: the benefits, effects, and how to prepare yourself

Three development projects in Kansas, Wisconsin, and Minnesota show how states manage revenues and tax assessments from transmission lines in different ways.

Center for Rural Affairs policy associate, Katie Rock, and policy associate, Lu Nelsen, recently discussed these examples on the Rural Matters podcast with host John White. They also gave tips on how best to communicate with developers, as well as advice for community members on how they can educate themselves about development projects.

Staff Spotlight: Community and family are top priorities for Lizzie

Native communities, such as Santee, Nebraska, the principal village of the Santee Sioux Reservation in Knox County, often lack access to the fresh fruits and vegetables necessary for healthy living. Because of their size and rural location, these communities can also get left out when considering funding opportunities for these essential foods and other development projects.

Lizzie Swalley hopes to change that.

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