Get the Newsletter

 

Recent posts by Sandra Renner

Apply for value-added producer grants by January 2018, read about success stories

“Creating and marketing value-added products has the potential to significantly enhance our farm's profitability, but this is no easy task. Our value-added funds will help pay for processing, marketing, distribution, and sales of our pasture-raised chickens and eggs, as well as microgreens that we grow,” said Alex McKiernan, co-owner of Robinette Farms near Lincoln, Nebraska. The farm received a working capital grant in 2015.

Students and educators benefit from growing food

In the last 20 years, small schools facing budget cuts often removed elective classes. This left skills like cooking and growing fruits and vegetables unlearned.

Center for Rural Affairs’ Greenhouse to Cafeteria program has been a solution for schools that have faced those decisions in the past. Not only does it fill a hole left in the curriculum, it also means healthier foods are served at lunch.

Farmers and ranchers apply climate data

For farmers and ranchers, climate and weather are not “new trends” as much as they are experiences of day-to-day reality. There is quite a lot of data available on climate change and no lack of controversy over that same data.

Here at the Center for Rural Affairs, we support farmers and ranchers who work in an ever-changing climate. Our recent conservation learning circles for women farmers and landowners have included guidance in sorting through climate data and making it applicable. Farmers can then study their impacts and prepare for the future.

Plate to Politics trains women to lead

Imagine you feel strongly about an issue, but don’t know how to take steps to get involved.

Or you want to run for a seat on a local committee that might benefit from your voice or input. You feel you lack the skills or, more often, confidence to run.

This is the reality for many women in rural areas. Opportunities for improvements in communities or on a council fail to attract us because maybe we haven’t been in the “traditional” workforce or haven’t worked “in town.” We even feel we wouldn’t be taken seriously.

Rural Food Business Toolkit

Rural food businesses are growing. This toolkit from the Center for Rural Affairs provides resources to help rural food businesses succeed. 

The sections of this toolkit address steps throughout the supply chain that get products into consumers’ hands. The resources are primarily intended for value-added food processing business owners, and are also useful for commercial kitchen operators, farmers, distributors and anyone with an interest in great food and local businesses.

File attachments: 

Pages