News

Electrify the Economy

A report from the Deep Decarbonization Pathways Project got me thinking about the rural development potential of transforming the energy sector.

The report outlines pathways to reduce carbon pollution between now and 2050. The goal is to limit global warming to 2 degrees Celsius. Meeting the benchmark is feasible and even affordable with technology already available, according to the report.

Deep decarbonization will require large scale transformation of our energy sector. This transformation is underway, but significant work lays ahead.

Improving food systems, enhancing lives

Sharon Freemont sits on a stool in the evening, weeding the garden. Sometimes her three grandchildren join her.

The garden is surrounded by high grass, and beyond that, fields, shaded in the evening by a lone tree.

“It’s nice in the evening, I sit, relax and meditate,” Sharon said. “We sit and look at what we’ve done, it’s something we did all by ourselves.”

The family has a small garden at their home three miles outside of Walthill, Neb., on the Omaha Reservation.

Mapping the Coverage Gap

There was much discussion last spring in Nebraska Legislature about whether we should find a way to help people in our state who fall into the health coverage gap to finally afford health insurance. Unfortunately, our state leaders again failed to capitalize on a solution to this ongoing problem.

Wind Energy Payments Contribute to Local Roads

The Mower County (MN) Board of Commissioners recently voted to dedicate revenue from local wind farms to road repairs and maintenance. The payment, likely $330,000 to $500,000 each year for a 10-year period, will contribute significantly toward fixing important infrastructure in the county.
 
Renewable energy generation continues to grow as an industry. New infrastructure has made it possible for projects to be built across the Midwest, bringing with them a range of benefits, some obvious, others less so.
 

Beginning farmer grows organic and sheep operation

Justin Doerr left the Army after serving overseas and knew he wanted to farm for his civilian career. He is big on planning, so he attended farm tours and webinars across three states to prepare for launching his farm business. He eased back into sheep production, using facilities his parents had vacated while Justin was in the service. Since his youth was spent following his father's direction on farm tasks rather than making his own farm decisions, Justin wanted to share the risk in his startup year of crop production.

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