Farm to School

The landscape of food on children’s plates here in Nebraska is rapidly transpiring into healthy and delicious bites.
Farm to School is a natural fit for Nebraska's rich history in agriculture. The term "Farm to School" refers to schools serving local, farm-fresh foods. This can range from fruits and vegetables to eggs to honey to meat. Often schools incorporate curriculums built around nutrition, agriculture, and science. Doing this creates learning opportunities based on experience, like farm visits, gardening, recycling, and entrepreneurial programs.
 
For more information about the Farm to School program sponsored by the Center of Rural Affairs, contact Sarah Smith, sarahs@cfra.org or 402.783.1183.
 
 

The National Farm to School Network (NFSN) sprouted from the desire to support community-based food systems, strengthen family farms, and improve student health. NFSN was launched by a collaboration of more than 30 organizations seeking to shape the burgeoning farm to school movement. It's grown from a handful of schools in the late 1990s to approximately 38,000 schools in all 50 states today.

Farm to School Notes

 

Two Farm to School Trainings set

Join us for one of our last two Farm to School trainings.

We promise you won’t go away hungry; you will leave inspired and ready to make some initial first steps to bring the farm to your local school.

Center for Rural Affairs has partnered with UNL Extension to offer six farm to school trainings across the state. We’ve traveled to East Butler Public Schools in Brainard, Wayne Public Schools, North Platte Public Schools and the Nebraska School Nutrition Association Conference held in Kearney.

Students eat healthy and learn with tower gardens

After providing a lesson in the kindergarten classroom, we cut the lettuce to put in the school lunch program. Two students started jumping up and down saying “Yes! We get a salad for snack today!” The teacher said, “No that lettuce is going to go toward feeding the school today at lunch. We get graham crackers for a snack.” The whole class sighed in disappointment. -Christy Hodges

Farm to School programs are emerging around the Midwest, and the Center for Rural Affairs is in the midst of the momentum.

Hilda Considera Granja a Escuela

For an English version of this story, please click here.

Antes invadido por hierbas altas y pinos, una área rodeado de milpas de maíz en las afueras de Fremont, ahora es un oasis de alimento.

Hilda Moreno y su esposo, Carlos Alvarado Vega, son granjeros principiantes Latinos. La pareja compró la granja hace dos años y por la petición de sus hijos empezaron un negocio de aves de corral de pequeña escala enfocados en la producción de huevos.