About the Center for Rural Affairs

We are unapologetically rural. We stand up for the small family farmer and rancher, new business owner, and rural communities.

For more than 40 years, we've been a leading force engaging people to build a better rural future. We live this work. Welcome to our rural revolution.

Join our newsletter list to learn about what's happening in rural America and at the Center!

 We have offices in three main locations: Lyons, Nebraska, at 145 Main St., PO Box 136; Nevada, Iowa, at 1210 Sixth St., Ste. 102; and Hartington, Nebraska, at 106 N. Broadway, PO Box 736; as well as in-home offices throughout Nebraska.

It Starts...

We breathed fire and ran on unrefined youthful energy. It was 1973. Our founders, Don Ralston and Marty Strange, captured our early history here (recommended reading!).

We knew that if we wanted federal policy to work for rural Americans, we had to raise our voice. So we opened shop in an old storefront in rural Nebraska and put nose-to-grindstone. We grew a rural grassroots community. We spoke up about corporate wrongs against family farmers. We took rural voices to Washington. 

We believed we would succeed. It was hard work, but our passion kept us standing strong for rural Americans. And now, we’re over 30,000 and growing across the nation. We’re proud of our track record of successes. See a timeline with some of our major accomplishments here.

As long as rural advocates are needed for health care, clean energy, sustainable agriculture, and community development, you can bet we’ll be in the front lines, building a bright rural future.

Make yourself at home and take look around! We look forward to working with you for rural Americans.

About the Center for Rural Affairs Notes

 

Center for Rural Affairs May and June newsletter

Note from the Editor:

Honoring our spring tradition of recognizing graduates close to our organization, we offer our best wishes to Brock Vetick, son of Shawn and Pat Vetick. Shawn is our accounting clerk. Brock will graduate from Lyons-Decatur Northeast High School. He plans to attend the University of Nebraska-Lincoln, and major in plant biology. His goal is to become a plant geneticist.

This edition

This edition of our newsletter focuses on citizen INVOLVEMENT and action to shape the future.

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Greenhouse to Cafeteria

Center for Rural Affairs launched the Greenhouse to Cafeteria program in 2015 after finding that many schools in Nebraska had greenhouses, but only used those greenhouses for starting perennials or growing holiday plants. Some were even empty - a missed opportunity for Nebraska’s kids.

The program assists schools in teaching valuable lessons as the kids to start, tend, and harvest plants. Greenhouses transform into edible organic gardens that provide food for the school cafeteria, educate students about where food comes from, and teach entrepreneurial skills.

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Meet our 2018 Farm Bill team

The upcoming 2018 Farm Bill is in the works and we want your voice heard!

The Center for Rural Affairs has been working diligently to advocate for rural America in a variety of areas including conservation, crop insurance, and beginning farmer assistance.

Congress’ agriculture committees who write the Farm Bill have started hearings already. We expect they will be gearing up to do further work this fall. We’re planning to send you updates as this unfolds and we’ll let you know key times when your legislators need to hear from you.

Stephanie Enloe: it has been an honor

Note: We said goodbye to Stephanie at the beginning of July. We wish her well in her future endeavors. 

During the past two and a half years, I’ve had the opportunity to work on some fascinating issues — renewable energy, water quality, Farm Bill policy, and climate change. Now, I’m off to graduate school at Cornell University.

From the desk of the executive director: people powered capital

Almost weekly, I read surprising new statistics about capital concentration.

The eight richest people in the world now control as much capital as half of the world’s population. The richest 158 families in the United States were the source of more than 50 percent of early cash in the last presidential campaign cycle. The world’s largest company is worth half a trillion dollars.