About the Center for Rural Affairs

We are unapologetically rural. We stand up for the small family farmer, new business owner, and rural communities. For 40 years, we've been a leading force engaging people to build a better rural future.

We believe that where you live shouldn't determine your access to opportunity, education, and health. That's why we take rural voices to Washington, and we don't back down until we see that policies reflect the needs of all rural citizens.

We live for this work. Welcome to our rural movement.

Join us today.

It Starts...

We breathed fire and ran on unrefined youthful energy. It was 1973. We knew that if we wanted federal policy to work for rural Americans, we had to raise our voice. So we opened shop in an old storefront in rural Nebraska and put nose-to-grindstone. We grew a rural grassroots community. We spoke up about corporate wrongs against family farmers. We took rural voices to Washington.

We believed we would succeed. It was hard work, but our passion kept us standing strong for rural Americans. And now, we’re over 30,000 and growing across the nation. We’re proud of our track record of successes.

As long as rural advocates are needed for health care, clean energy, sustainable agriculture, and community development, you can bet we’ll be in the front lines, building a bright rural future.

Make yourself at home and take look around! We look forward to working with you for rural Americans.

About the Center for Rural Affairs Notes

 

We Are Rural: 2013 Annual Report

The Center for Rural Affairs turned 40 years old this year. Think about that for a minute. When Marty Strange and Don Ralston first threw open the doors 40 years ago, it was anyone’s guess if the scrappy organization on main street in a town of 800 would make it for one year.

It didn’t take long before rural people were flocking in from across the state.

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Bringing the Farm Back to School

Children across Nebraska are back in school, mourning the loss of summer, and probably unenthused about their school lunches. But there might be something new on the menu, thanks to a Nebraska Farm to School pilot program that more than a dozen Nebraska schools are partaking in, some students will forego the same old cafeteria fare, and enjoy fresh and locally sourced produce.

Rooted in Place, Speaking Nationally

Just this week, I heard from people in New Jersey and England. Both wrote to say the values of the Center connected with them.

The writer from New Jersey asked a question. “Your work appears to be applicable to rural communities in any state, but the discussion on your website often seems to focus on the midwest and central plains. Are the challenges faced by rural communities in other regions on your radar screen?”

The answer is yes.

Fighting for Your Hopes and Dreams for Rural America

Here at the Center for Rural Affairs, we enjoy a good debate. In fact, we encourage it. We don’t expect everyone to agree with us. But we’ve been around for 40 years, working diligently to be an independent voice advocating for public policies and actions that create a better future for family farmers, ranchers, and small towns across all of rural America.