Small Towns

Rural communities hold the keys to survival in their own hands. With help from policies that build on their strengths as desirable places to live and raise families, they can thrive.
Do these fit with rural communities? Tell us what you think!

Community Development

To thrive, rural communities must invest in themselves and their futures, including rural schools and rural leaders.

Community Food Systems

Local farmers markets, community gardens, and local and regional food systems provide fresh, healthy food for all and keep money circulating in the local economy.

Rural Groceries

Small towns across rural America are losing their grocery stores, and we’re working to help groceries stay around.

Small Towns Notes

 

The Case for Small Schools

Our Small Schools series of articles began as a response to public statements about the need to eliminate small, rural schools. They said small schools are “inefficient,” and take away too many resources (i.e., public aid to education) from deserving larger schools.

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Dear Mr. President: keep rural America a priority

Dear Mr. President: 

As organizations representing rural America, we look forward to working with your Administration in the coming years to help ensure that all Americans face a brighter future. We also look forward to having Governor Perdue at the helm of the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA), working on behalf of rural America. 

As you witnessed first-hand during the campaign, the issues facing rural America are no less significant than those facing urban parts of the country, but can more easily be overlooked because America’s small towns and rural areas make up just 15 percent of the nation’s population. 

Top 5 of 2016: Part 2 - Immigrants and Latinos Bring Economic Growth to Rural Communities

The year in review countdown continues with a piece by Brian Hanson, senior policy associate. Since joining us in June, Brian has taken a hard look at trends in rural America. One of his first projects was taking a look at economic and population growth brought into rural counties by Latinos and immigrants, with the second portion coming in at number four.

Energy efficiency starts at home

There is a degree of irony discussing energy efficiency during a time of year when many homes are lit like runways. Yet, the cost of a running a few twinkling lights, LEDs of course, pales in comparison to the dollars in heating costs that escape through drafty windows or a furnace in need of a tune-up. Recognizing these opportunities for improved energy efficiency in your home can have a collective impact.