Farm Bill

While it has some good provisions, the Center for Rural Affairs opposed the final Farm Bill in 2014 and we are currently working on improving the 2018 Farm Bill.

We are interested in hearing from you about conservation, crop insurance, beginning farmer policy, rural economic development and local food systems. Please take our short survey to provide your valued insights.

The 2014 bill was negotiated behind closed doors. It stripped out bipartisan reforms both the House and Senate had passed earlier. 

The bill turned aside real reform passed in both House and Senate to essentially create a commodity program that will provide unlimited payments to mega-farms, no matter how large they get, as long as payments flow to family members.

It also failed to make any headway on limiting crop insurance premium subsidies. This Farm Bill will continue to provide virtually unlimited farm program payments and crop insurance premium subsidies to the nation’s largest and wealthiest farms, placing small and midsized and beginning farmers at a competitive disadvantage.

Click here to see our full review of why the 2014 Farm Bill lacks true reform.
Click here to see our original proposals for the 2014 farm bill.

Farm Bill Notes

 

Farm bill priorities: conservation

Conservation programs guide farmers and ranchers in improving land soil and water quality.

Maintain the strength of our working lands conservation programs, Environmental Quality Incentive Program (EQIP) and Conservation Stewardship Program (CSP).

Preserve funding and continue technical assistance support. With these programs, farmers and ranchers can steward their soil and water resources for the next generation without breaking the bank.

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Farm bill priorities: crop insurance

Crop insurance should better serve rural communities. 

Stop allowing taxpayer dollars to go without limit to the largest farmers.

Cap crop insurance subsidies at $50,000. Other public support programs have limits; it makes sense to have limits on crop insurance subsidies, too. Who does this impact? Only 0.9 percent of farmers in 2010 and 2.5 percent of farmers in 2011 received premium subsidies greater than $50,000 and would have been impacted by a cap.

Manage risk through conservation.

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Farm bill could help farmers, soil health, and water quality

Do you care about soil health, clean water, and farmers’ ability to make a living and steward their land? Time to tune in. Congress has started work on the next farm bill, and now is when they need to hear from you: the voters.

The next farm bill offers a major opportunity to support conservation through the crop insurance program. Crop insurance is a must-have for most farmers. Linking crop insurance to conservation is therefore a smart way for Congress to invest taxpayer dollars in supporting farmers and strengthening stewardship of natural resources.

Farm bill conversations: crop insurance

The Center for Rural Affairs farm bill team has been working hard to make sure you have up-to-date and important farm bill information. Over the past few weeks we have sent out information regarding our farm bill priorities. This week, we’re talking about crop insurance reform and how you can get involved by contacting your representatives.

Here are two things we’d like to see change with crop insurance through the 2018 farm bill:

Farm bill conversations: conservation

The Center for Rural Affairs wants to work with you to advocate for conservation in the upcoming 2018 farm bill!

Over the next few months we will share our farm bill priorities with you – beginning with conservation.

We need to protect funding and strengthen working lands conservation programs such as the Conservation Stewardship Program (CSP) and Environmental Quality Incentives Program (EQIP).