News

Students and educators benefit from growing food

In the last 20 years, small schools facing budget cuts often removed elective classes. This left skills like cooking and growing fruits and vegetables unlearned.

Center for Rural Affairs’ Greenhouse to Cafeteria program has been a solution for schools that have faced those decisions in the past. Not only does it fill a hole left in the curriculum, it also means healthier foods are served at lunch.

REAP Women's Business Center: Eight trainings recently completed, more planned

Rural Enterprise Assistance Project (REAP) Women’s Business Center continues to partner with local organizations to offer “Online Marketing Strategies.”

In June, training sessions were held in O’Neill, Valentine, Ainsworth, and Alma.

We also offered a “Facebook for Business” session in Sidney.

One key to business success is accurate and timely recordkeeping. QuickBooks trainings were held in O’Neill and Hartington this spring.

A “Business Plan Basics” course was offered in Walthill in cooperation with the City of Walthill.

Working in a farm successor as part of a retirement plan

Are you one of the many farmers without an identified farm successor? Purdue University says that's around 75 percent, and about half expect nonfamily members to take over. A gradual shift of responsibilities and ownership, plus an extended mentoring period, can help ensure the continued success of the farm business.

After checking out a candidate's experience and references, a short trial period with paid labor can be a good step. This probationary period can help both of you assess how well you work together, how your daily priorities match up, and how you deal with setbacks.

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