REAP

Our Rural Enterprise Assistance Project is committed to strengthening rural communities through small, self-employed business development. We offer four essential services: financing (micro loans), business training, technical assistance, and networking.

Call on REAP when you are thinking of starting a small business or if you already operate a small business in Nebraska. You can find your nearest REAP business specialist here. Through REAP you can create a business plan, research potential markets and marketing ideas, discuss management issues with experienced business specialists, and apply for a small business loan.

Started in 1990, REAP has provided services to numerous micro/small businesses throughout Nebraska. (A micro business is defined as one with 10 or fewer employees.) We've placed over $10 million in loans and leveraged over $17 million in additional funds from other sources.

REAP is a proud member of the Nebraska Small Business Collaborative, extending microenterprise businesses technical assistance and micro-loans in all distressed areas of Nebraska. You can learn more about REAP here.

REAP Notes

 

Fast (and Sickening) Facts About Payday Lenders

The rates, terms, and reality of payday loans are sickening for everyone, but especially for rural residents. Small towns have a high percentage of self-employed rural people. Entrepreneurs need access to capital, so it's important for consumers to product their financial health. A poor credit history will limit the number of financial options open to entrepreneurs. Anything that prevents current entrepreneurs from growing or budding dreamers from opening a business harms rural communities, where entrepreneurs are a major economic force. They are often strong community leaders too.

Fast (and Sickening) Facts About Payday Lenders

It might seem like a good idea when you're a bit short on cash, but payday loans are a trap. Payday lenders target low and moderate-income people. They advertise payday loans as a quick, easy way to help a person make it until the next payday.

In reality, payday loans begin cycle of chronic indebtedness. According to the Center for Responsible Lending, the average borrower ends up indebted for more than six months with an average of nine payday loan transactions at annual interest rates exceeding 400%. 

Community Outreach a Perfect Fit for Monica Braun

Monica Braun is the director of the Women’s Business Center (WBC) of the Rural Enterprise Assistance Project (REAP) at the Center for Rural Affairs. This role is a perfect fit for her rich background in community outreach and deep roots in south central Nebraska.

She graduated from Superior High School and attended the University of Nebraska, where she received a Bachelor’s Degree in Consumer Science. She also received a graduate degree from UNL in Education and Family Resource Management with a minor in Ag Economics.