Farm and Food

Resources, ideas and strategies for new and diversifying farmers and those interested in the comeback of the family farm

Whether your family has been farming or ranching for generations or you're just beginning a farm career, the Center for Rural Affairs has resources to help you grow a successful farm business.

Beginning Farmer and Rancher Opportunities

New farmers and ranchers have unique needs. The Center for Rural Affairs offers resources and support to help beginning farmers and ranchers start successful farm careers.
 
Land Matching - Farm transfers between retiring farmers and a new generation of beginners are a great way to preserve family farms and help beginners break into farming and ranching.

Veteran Farmers Project

In the last 10 years, almost a million of our military’s servicemen and servicewomen have come from rural communities. As these veterans return home, they bring with them an opportunity to employ their passion, discipline, and sense of service to revitalize America’s small farms and rural communities. Learn more about our training and support programs for veteran farmers.

Women Farmers

The Center for Rural Affairs is partnering with Women, Food, and Agriculture Network (WFAN) to help aspiring and beginning women farmers turn their farming dreams into reality through training and mentorships with established women farmers. Learn more about upcoming opportunities for women farmers.

Farm Finances

Farms are businesses, and as with any business, sound financial planning is crucial to success. Considering your farm finances is especially important for beginners getting started and for landowners considering farm transfers.

High Value Markets

One key to having a viable small-scale farm is producing a high-value product. Customers will pay more for non-generic, non-commodity products that make are unique to your farm. These products return a higher profit to your farm business. 

Additional Farming Programs and Resources

Learn about additional resources available to help your farm grow and thrive.

Farm and Food Notes

 

Local and Regional Food Systems in Nebraska: Best Practices and Case Studies

Outlines best practices for developing local and regional food systems in the state. First-hand information came from interviews we conducted with individuals, organizations, and institutions involved in the production, marketing, and usage of local food. They are docmented through nine case studies.

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Regional Food Systems in Nebraska: Report on Consumer, Producer, and Institutional Focus Groups

In February 2013, the Center for Rural Affairs (CFRA) released a report Regional Food Systems in Nebraska: The Views of Consumers, Producers and Institutions, analyzing the results of a survey responded to by Nebraskans on local food system issues.

After the survey was completed, CFRA held a series of focus groups for each of the project relevant groups – consumers, producers, food-serving institutions and grocery stores. This supplemental report provides findings and observations from those focus groups.

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Old Farmer’s Almanac Seeks 21st Century Stories

How would you like a free copy of The 2018 Old Farmer’s Almanac ?

The Old Farmer's Almanac has been a resource to farmers and gardeners since 1792, with seasonal advice, planting tips and practices, and an array of helpful and entertaining matter in every annual edition.

The writers at the almanac are looking to introduce readers across the U.S. and Canada to 21st century farmers and are looking for farmers to be a part of this project! 

If It Were Easy, Everyone Would Be Doing It

“If it were easy, everyone would be doing it.” That's what my father, Bill Greeley, a rancher from Imperial, Nebraska, had to say after blizzard Selene foiled his plans of swiftly transporting newly acquired cows home from the Ogallala Livestock Market.

The storm hit just as he left the sale barn, the trailer filled with pregnant cows. Bill had hoped to get the cattle home before the storm got worse. An hour and 30 minutes later, he had only made it 19 miles down the road to the small town of Grant.

Farm Girl Journal Captures the Joy of Growing up on a Farm

Living in rural and small-town America is not a challenge, or a burden. I love living in a small town, having the ability to know my neighbors, and a genuine feeling of connectedness to the land and natural world. I can look out of my window at our garden, our flowers, the birds (and squirrels) at our birdfeeder. If that isn’t enough, in two minutes I can be in the countryside.