Clean Energy

Clean energy offers a significant opportunity to diversify the rural economy, create new opportunity and address the root cause of climate change.
Support EPA's rule to limit carbon emissions from existing power plants.

Wind energy and other renewable energy will revitilize rural communities rich in energy resources. When the Nebraska legislature held a hearing on wind development, one group of citizens drove 400 miles to testify that for the first time in memory, there was renewed hope for the future of their community. The economics are clear.

To maxmise the impact, there is a critical need for new and upgraded transmission capacity to unlock the renewable energy potential found in rural America. Both our economy and our future depend on moving power from the remote regions of the Great Plains and Upper Midwest to the demand centers that need it most.

Our goal is to better assist landowners and other rural stakeholders to ensure that clean energy transmission is built in an equitable, sustainable way - a way that works best for rural citizens and their communities. Those affected by new transmission will benefit from forming real partnerships with developers and those in the regulatory sphere, relationships that result in greater engagement in planning, new responsiveness to concerns and more equitable compensation models.

See our clean energy transmission database here. Learn about our work to replace coal fired energy with renewables (it's an infograph!)

Clean Energy Notes

 

Landowner Compensation in Transmission Siting for Renewable Energy Facilities

Economic and environmental concerns have popularized renewable energy projects as a source of electricity generation. The price of electricity generated by wind or solar power is more competitive today than ever before.

Yet development of renewable energy projects is limited by existing transmission capacity. Without increased infrastructure, the full benefits of wind and solar power cannot be realized.

File attachments: 

The Science Behind Planet Earth’s Atmosphere

Summer is hotter than winter, right? Ever wonder why summer is warmer than winter, and why Phoenix is hotter than Fargo? The answer to both of these questions, of course, has to do with how much heat is coming into the atmosphere, and how much is going out.

The sun’s rays are much more directly overhead in the summer because our side of the Earth is pointed towards the sun and less directly overhead in the winter. Likewise, the sun’s rays in Phoenix are more direct over a longer part of the year, so it is warmer than Fargo.

Testimony on Limiting Carbon Pollution Drawn from Rural People and Stories

I traveled to Denver in late July to testify at a public hearing on the Environmental Protection Agency’s carbon pollution rule. The rule will rein in carbon pollution and curb climate change. I brought your stories – the stories of rural people we know to the hearing.

Stories from people like Matt Russell, a 5th generation farmer from Iowa who feels he’s already experiencing the effects of climate change. He’s worried we won’t be able to meet the needs of a growing population if the agricultural systems we have in place now are no longer viable with a changing climate.