Clean Energy

Clean energy offers a significant opportunity to diversify the rural economy, create new opportunity and address the root cause of climate change.

Wind energy and other renewable energy will revitalize rural communities rich in energy resources. When the Nebraska legislature held a hearing on wind development, one group of citizens drove 400 miles to testify that for the first time in memory, there was renewed hope for the future of their community. The economics are clear.

To maximize the impact, there is a critical need for new and upgraded transmission capacity to unlock the renewable energy potential found in rural America. Both our economy and our future depend on moving power from the remote regions of the Great Plains and Upper Midwest to the demand centers that need it most.

Our goal is to better assist landowners and other rural stakeholders to ensure that clean energy transmission is built in an equitable, sustainable way - a way that works best for rural citizens and their communities. Those affected by new transmission will benefit from forming real partnerships with developers and those in the regulatory sphere, relationships that result in greater engagement in planning, new responsiveness to concerns and more equitable compensation models.

See our clean energy transmission database here. Learn about our work to replace coal fired energy with renewables (infographs to share!)

Clean Energy Notes

 

Coal to Clean Infographics, April 2016

Nebraska's energy future can be a bright one. Nebraska Public Power District (NPPD) can choose to invest in clean, sustainable energy options that grow our communities. Here are four excellent reasons why they should:

 

 

A Switch to Wind Energy Could Save 1.9 Billion Gallons of Water

Nebraska relies heavily on coal to generate electricity in the state, even though we rank 4th in the nation for wind energy potential and 13th for solar power potential. These resources could easily play a larger role in our energy portfolio. Especially since demand for electricity generated from these energy resources is growing dramatically from individual customers and regional markets.

From Coal to Clean in Hallam, Nebraska

Sheldon Station is an aging coal-fired power plant constructed in 1958 near Hallam, Nebr. Sheldon Station is the biggest polluter in Lancaster County and changing environmental regulations make continuing operations at Sheldon Station uneconomical. Sheldon Station's 80 dedicated employees deserve a transition plan for job creation and economic growth after the plant is retired.