Weekly Column

Congressional appropriators: please fund farm bill programs

Every five years (or so), Congress passes legislation that shapes the day-to-day living of rural Americans. This legislation is a complex bundle of various programs and policies more commonly referred to as the farm bill. Key Congressional leaders in both the House and Senate influence the farm bill through work on their respective agriculture committees, which is a process that should not be taken lightly.

States, big ag move to revoke basic property rights

Across the nation, six states have passed or proposed policies that serve as a clear rebuke of private property rights. In Utah, Nebraska, Georgia, North Carolina, West Virginia, and Oklahoma, state lawmakers are framing expanded Right to Farm legislation as a litmus test in a divisive political environment. A vote against, we are told, is a vote against agriculture.

Don’t be fooled. It’s a false choice.

Protect your property rights

Our Unicameral Legislature gave first-round approval to Legislative Bill (LB) 227. An amendment to the “Right to Farm Act,” this bill is being sold as a litmus test in a divisive political environment. A vote against, we are told, is a vote against agriculture.

Don’t be fooled. It’s a false choice.

LB 227 is a bill to limit your personal property rights. Every landowner is entitled to the use and enjoyment of their land. When someone or something interferes with that right, you can pursue legal remedies. This is a last resort when nothing else works.

Iowa's flood history gives rise to water quality action

Recent and continued flooding along the Missouri River and throughout Iowa has revived discussion around water quality. Iowa’s history shows that natural disasters can be unifying moments on divisive issues. Following the 2008 floods in eastern Iowa, the Legislature took an interest in preventing flood damage.

While Iowans are dealing with immediate questions from this emergency, legislators are asking what the state can do. A few organizations are offering their own suggestions, including the following three ideas.

For our citizens, for our schools, for our future

We are more than six months removed from the election of our state legislators. While time has passed, voters have not forgotten the stumps on property tax relief that prompted their votes. Now, the true test of our senators’ commitment to tax reform and property tax relief for all Nebraskans is about to play out.

Optimism for the passage of a property tax relief package remains.

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