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Recent posts by Tyler Vacha

Your 2018 Advocacy Toolkit

Do you know what happens in September 2018? The entire federal farm bill expires.

That means the end of critical programs that support beginning farmers, conservation, and small town development, unless we act now to urge Congress to renew them with a new farm bill this year. This action kit outlines critical priorities for farm bill renewal.

Ensure your legacy and impact by contributing to the Granary Foundation

Did you know the Center for Rural Affairs has an endowment? We do! It’s called the Granary Foundation, and it exists to ensure the Center can continue doing our important work in rural America for generations to come.

Through the years, many of you have made investments in the Center, its work, and the future of rural America. Those investments have gone a long way toward establishing a brighter, stronger rural future. Making a contribution to the Granary Foundation is a great way to secure your legacy and impact.

Supporting rural America and the Center

Wow, this year is flying by! It seems like just yesterday we were celebrating the New Year. Together, in the first half of 2017 we accomplished so much because of generous support from donors like you. Thank you.

Recent exciting developments make it possible for your giving to have an even greater effect. Please consider these options as you think about fall and holiday giving.

You made our holiday giving a success

Now that you’ve had a chance to recover from the holidays, I want to extend a warm thank you to all of our great donors who have helped to make our end-of-year fundraising efforts the most successful we’ve ever had.

Starting in October and including our Giving Tuesday and holiday efforts, you and other grassroots donors contributed nearly $117,000 to help fund our efforts for the upcoming year. Your remarkable generosity will drive our successes in 2017 and help with important issues we expect to face.

Near miss serves as a farm safety reminder

It was a cool summer morning. I had been given the chore of stacking 13 or so big round bales that were in the small alfalfa field on my parents’ acreage. I was driving an old Allis Chalmers D17 with forks on a Westendorf loader in front, and rear forks as well.

I was traveling downhill with a bale on the front forks and nothing on the back when suddenly something didn’t feel right. I looked over my right shoulder just in time to see my rear wheel was about three feet off the ground and rising. I had loaded the tractor wrong, and a rollover was imminent.

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