Get the Newsletter

 

Recent posts by Liz Daehnke

From a military career to sustainable agriculture: Hoops can handle it all

Veteran. Farmer. Business owner. Father.

These are just a few of the titles Brent Hoops holds. He’s also a conservationist who utilizes environmental preservation and protection practices on Good Earth Farms, his commercial soybean and corn operation, near Hastings, Nebraska.

Hoops shared his conservation experience at the Center for Rural Affairs’ Veteran Farmer Conference in March.

Latino-owned businesses in Nebraska almost doubled in five years, according to report

Husband and wife business partners, Diego Leon and Jenny Lopez, rely on their memories of Colombian fruit and juice stands to recreate the vibrant and unique dishes of their homeland. These thoughts inspire their restaurant, FRUIT, in Grand Island, Nebraska.

The couple immigrated to the U.S. in 2014, and opened their business in January 2016. Diego says starting their venture was an intensive process, but a labor of love.

Harding receives George Norris Policymaker Award

Mary Harding has strong feelings about public power and rural advocacy.

Her passion for these issues has become the focus of her work, as she has been a member of the Nebraska Public Power District (NPPD) Board of Directors since 2003. And, until recently, served as the only woman on the board.

Mary’s dedication has not wavered over the years, which has led the Center for Rural Affairs to bestow upon her the 2017 George Norris Policymaker Award. She was recognized at a ceremony on March 9 in Red Cloud, Nebraska.

Staff spotlight: Gladys cares about community inclusion

Gladys Godinez knows firsthand what it’s like being an immigrant in America.

A native of Guatemala City, Guatemala, Gladys’ experiences over the years sparked a passion for inclusion work. She’s spent her entire adult life helping bridge communities through civic engagement, and goes out of her way to include others as community members, students, and clients.

Love of animals leads to business ownership for REAP Entrepreneur of the Year

At the age of 5, Jennafer Glaesemann already knew what she wanted to do with her life. There was no question about it – she was going to be a veterinarian.

Growing up on a dairy farm, she often helped her father with late night check-ups on the mama cows, some of which suffered from a condition called milk fever. These cows had very low calcium levels, and needed to be given the mineral intravenously. Though she only held the flashlight, and watched her father perform the procedure, Jennafer recalls being taken with the notion of helping these animals.

Pages