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Recent posts by Kathie Starkweather

Think beyond biases to create welcoming communities

We all discriminate.

It does not matter if you are a person of color or not, female or male, young or old, gay or straight. We all discriminate.

I’m not talking about intentional discrimination, like denying housing based on gender or the color of skin. I’m talking about nonconscious discrimination that is caused by the way our brains work; and we are completely unaware.

Virtual Leader Development Program Goes Rural

Leaders are the life-blood of small towns and rural communities. The success or failure of community development efforts often rests with the degree of leadership local citizens are willing to provide. You can see our 4-part series on leadership here.

Now our colleagues at The University of Nebraska Omaha have asked us to share a new rural leadership program with you. Several of our Farm and Community team are participating, so you will be in good company! Their description of the program follows.

Farm to School Continues to Build in Nebraska

“Healthy students learn better because they eat better,” stated Dr. John Skretta in Beatrice during the Center for Rural Affairs’ most recent Farm to School Regional Conference. Skretta, school administrator of Norris School District in Firth, NE, started off the conference on the Southeast Community College campus with a powerful keynote.

Dr. Skretta talked about the need for farm to school programs. He noted they take “all hands on deck,” from administrators to great food service staff, teachers, and parents. And it is well worth the integrated approach.

Celebrate Farms and Schools in Nebraska

In October, America celebrates the harvest, and specifically initiatives to put healthy, locally grown food on our childrens’ plates at school. And it all starts with America’s farmers and ranchers.
 
Many of us who raise our own food, whether in a pot or a small garden, do so as a hobby. If there’s too much heat, not enough rain or too many pests, we are disappointed and frustrated but the love of growing fresh, nutritious foods pulls us through tough times.
 

Celebrate Farms and Schools

In October, America celebrates the harvest, and specifically initiatives to put healthy, locally grown food on our childrens’ plates at school. And it all starts with America’s farmers and ranchers.
 
Many of us who raise our own food, whether in a pot or a small garden, do so as a hobby. If there’s too much heat, not enough rain or too many pests, we are disappointed and frustrated but the love of growing fresh, nutritious foods pulls us through tough times.
 

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