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Recent posts by Jordan Rasmussen

Delaying expansion will cost Nebraska hundreds of millions

When Nebraska voters expanded Medicaid coverage last November, they recognized not only the health benefits of expanded insurance coverage, but also the economic impact of it. Expansion is estimated to stimulate nearly $1.3 billion in economic activity in the first three years of implementation. Yet, Nebraska remains nearly a year and a half away from realizing these benefits.

Expansion efforts hit snags in states where voters expand coverage

On April 1, the Nebraska Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS) submitted a State Plan Amendment to the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services for review. The plan is a key first step to expanding the state’s Medicaid program to provide health insurance to those in the coverage gap. Pending approval, the plan outlines an October 2020 timeline for enrollment. This leaves hardworking Nebraskans in the coverage gap for nearly two years after the passage of the ballot Initiative 427.

Your rural voice: striking a property tax balance with LB 614

The Center for Rural Affairs agrees that property taxes are too high and local schools and government entities are forced to be too reliant on property taxes. This reliance upon property taxes for education and local government demands even the most comprehensive property tax relief plan receive careful scrutiny as these institutions underpin the existence of rural communities. Although we recognize that farmers and ranchers often bear the greatest tax burden, our mission is to support policy that builds strong rural communities and provides opportunity for all rural people. LB 614 achieves that policy goal.

Your rural voice: Property taxes and Nebraska’s Legislative Bill 276

Rural Nebraskans recognize the value of the education, health care, and public safety services which their tax dollars provide. These are the services that underpin and help sustain our rural communities and residents. Yet, these residents also recognize the state of Nebraska is not fulfilling its obligation to help pay for these services, especially in funding our K-12 school systems.

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