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Recent posts by Jordan Feyerherm

A 7-step recipe for a community garden

A community garden is a way to grow delicious, fresh produce and to bring together neighbors and community members. A community garden also requires buy-in from the community, proactive planning, and ongoing maintenance.

Every community is unique, and every garden has different needs and ingredients for success. Here are tips for a successful, sustainable community garden:

1. Plan ahead. Don’t feel like you need to plant all at once. Space plantings so you have a harvest most weeks.

A garden by the community, for the community

Grand Island gardeners are expectantly watching the weather, waiting to get their hands dirty and plants in the ground. This will be the third growing season since the Center for Rural Affairs helped evitalize the community garden located next to the Third City Community Clinic in Grand Island, Nebraska, and 2019 might be the best year yet.

Community garden takes root in Grand Island

A space that was once home to grass and weeds is now a burgeoning field of fresh crops.

This is the second year the Center for Rural Affairs has worked to establish a community garden at the Third City Community Clinic in Grand Island, Nebraska. Together, in partnership with CHI Health St. Francis, and Central Community College (CCC), we have been able to turn a piece of otherwise unused land into an urban garden.

Policymakers’ failed actions led to the O’Neill raid

At the Center for Rural Affairs, one of our guiding principles is to promote vibrant rural communities and the people who live here. A cornerstone of any community is safety, stability, and trust.

On Aug. 8 in O'Neill, Nebraska, that sense of community was shaken when 133 agricultural workers were taken from their places of employment and transferred to a detention center more than 100 miles away in Grand Island, leaving their families and children to wonder if their loved ones would ever return.

Overcoming three types of biases

When attempting to overcome bias, like anything else, knowing is half the battle. While many of us are familiar with the concept of bias, having a deeper understanding of what it is and how it manifests is often the first step in circumventing the negative ramifications. Bias can limit the potential for growth, innovation, and success on both an individual and community wide level. It can affect who we trust, what we value, and limit the scope of possibilities.

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