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Recent posts by Johnathan Hladik

Broadband is a basic service for all Nebraskans

From Omaha to the Panhandle, broadband access impacts every Nebraskan. From training a 21st century workforce to growing small business investment and supporting the state’s agricultural producers, our connection to broadband Internet has become a defining factor of our quality of life.

Unfortunately for many rural areas, the impact of broadband is measured not by access, but by its unmistakable absence.

An ancient legal principle still impacts Nebraska’s landowners

Adverse possession is a common law principle that dates back to 2000 B.C. The legal principle was mentioned in 5,046 cases in the United States between 1960 and 2015. During the same time period, there were 176 cases in Nebraska that cited adverse possession.

Under the doctrine, individuals who have occupied a parcel of land for 10 years can claim ownership if they meet certain legal requirements. To claim adverse possession under current Nebraska law, the requirements are:

Now is the time for the Legislature to step up on broadband

An overreliance on faulty data may be leaving thousands of rural Nebraska households out of the digital age. Twice per year, the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) collects broadband access data through Form 477 from internet service providers. This data has a host of problems and can severely overestimate broadband access.

Many Nebraskans are being left behind because of this inaccurate information. Meanwhile, state and local governments are using this information as a primary source to distribute their limited resources—something it was never intended to be used as.

Are property taxes on the ballot?

Up and down the campaign trail and all across Nebraska, candidates are quick to tell you that property tax is their number one priority. It’s true for incumbents and newcomers alike. Nearly every rural or statewide contender is ensuring voters that property tax is the primary focus.

These candidates show empathy when saying times are tough. They are quick to display confidence when telling us they “know how to fix it.” Some use flashy graphs, glossy charts, and selective statistics to show they are serious.

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