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Recent posts by Center for Rural Affairs

Switzer Ranch: Conservation Profile

The Switzer Ranch is a 12,000-acre diversified cattle ranch near the Calamus Reservoir in Loup County that has been in the family since 1904. Today four generations live on the land that, along with two neighboring ranches, is designated an Important Bird Area (IBA) by the Audubon Society - the first private site identified as an IBA in Nebraska.

Shovel Dot Ranch: Conservation Profile

“I think each generation of our family has learned new ideas and new methods to help improve the productivity and health of the land,” said Homer Buell, who owns and manages Shovel Dot Ranch along with his family.

Shovel Dot is home to the fourth and fifth generations of the Buell family. Larry and his wife, Nickie, as well as Homer and his wife, Darla make their homes on the ranch, although they have divided the ranch between them. Their children, the fifth generation of Buells have now taken over the day-to-day management of the operation.

Annual Report 2015: It's a Wall Calendar!

We tried something new for our latest annual report. We created a calendar to illustrate month-by-month the accomplishments you helped us achieve in the last year. From starting new businesses to to stewarding our land and water, to transforming the food our children eat, your donations and your actions helped lift the future of the Center and the people we serve.

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Wilson Ranch: Conservation Profile

Sitting in the office of his auto body shop, Max Wilson brings up satellite photographs of his land on Google Earth. Clicking through a decade of images, a dramatic change unfolds.

“We’re getting back to grass. In 10 years, I can see a lot of change,” he said, referring to the removal of eastern red cedar trees from his pastures. “Now it’s like a grassland instead of a forest.”

Beel Ranch: Conservation Profile

The Beel brothers are third-generation stewards of their family ranch located on the Brown and Cherry County line in the Nebraska Sandhills. Started in 1937 by Henry O. Beel, ranch records reveal conservation practices were an early concern: soil and water planning, water placement, rotational grazing, and planting of tree groves began in the 1940s. Today conservation and range management continue to play a central role at the Beel Ranch.

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