Omaha Reservation Community Farmers Market is open for 2018 season

Release Date: 

08/09/2018

Contact(s): 

Bounthy Parker, garden/orchard market assistant, bounthyp@cfra.org, 772.284.6253; or Rhea Landholm, brand marketing and communications manager, rheal@cfra.org, 402.687.2100 ext 1025

MACY, NEBRASKA – The Omaha Reservation Community Farmers Market has reopened for its fifth season. The events are part of the Omaha Nation Community Garden Project, a joint effort between the Center for Rural Affairs and Nebraska Indian Community College (NICC).

The market is open from 3 to 6 p.m. every Thursday through October. Locations rotate between downtown Walthill, Nebraska on Aug. 16, 30; Sept. 13, 27; Oct. 11, 25; and downtown Macy, Nebraska on Aug. 9, 23; Sept. 6, 20; Oct. 4, 18.

Along with locally-grown produce, visitors can purchase baked goods and other prepared foods. Authentic Native American buffalo bone carvings, inlaid jewelry, and beadwork from various artists will be available. Native American beaders will offer live jewelry-making demonstrations.

“A wide variety of fresh, local and healthy foods will be available for sale at the market,” said Bounthy Parker, garden/orchard market assistant with the Center for Rural Affairs. “The Center will be doing food preparation demonstrations, so be sure to stop by our tasting table for free samples.”

Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) cards are accepted.

The market launched in 2013 and has grown to more than 20 vendors in the 2018 season. There is still room for vendors to get involved, and all are welcome, including those from surrounding communities.

If you are interested in becoming a vendor at the Omaha Tribe Community Farmers Market, or would like more information, contact Bounthy at bounthyp@cfra.org, or 722.284.6253.

Working together with the community, NICC and the Center have also created a series of garden and market trainings throughout the year. The trainings include demonstrations on soil preparation, gardening and growing techniques, and assisting gardeners in preserving excess produce for use later or for sale.