Water News

What is a market-based approach to water quality?

Last month, the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) released a joint letter encouraging market-based, collaborative approaches to reduce excess nutrients in waterways. But, few other details were offered on how to best take this approach.

There are three possible market-based strategies for water quality improvement: nutrient reduction exchange, wetland mitigation banking, and environmental impact bonds.

2019 Iowa Legislative Priorities

In 2017, we developed an active presence on Iowa state policy, which continues today. Our priority issues include clean energy and water quality. We collaborate with coalition partners, develop relationships with key legislators, and engage Iowa supporters.

Relevant developments concerning priority legislation will be shared via email. To sign up for updates, email info@cfra.org.

What is a market-based approach to water quality?

Last week, the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) released a joint letter to state and tribal regulators encouraging market-based, collaborative approaches to reduce excess nutrients in waterways. But, few other details were offered on how to best take this approach. Now that the EPA has released some clarifications around the Waters of the U.S. ruling, it appears new efforts could be on the horizon.

Water Warriors: Bev and Dwight’s prairie paradise for water quality

Bev and Dwight Rutter describe their prairie farm as a hobby gone nuts.

Surrounded by 600 acres of restored and native prairie grass (and hundreds of pheasants), rests Bev and Dwight’s native seed and plant nursery, The Prairie Flower, near Spencer, Iowa. At the nursery, they sell a wide variety of local, native prairie and wetland plants and seeds. The Rutters also provide services such as ecological consulting and planning.

Water Warriors: Jerry balances conservation with yields

Mid-October in Iowa – temperatures have dropped, leaves are changing, and harvest should be in full swing. Yet, there I sat with Jerry Peckumn in his office when he should have been out in the combine. Thirteen days straight of heavy rains in central Iowa seriously stalled the harvest of the state’s corn and soybeans crops.

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