Farm to School News

Project Aims to Grow Food, Learning, and Entrepreneurship

Many schools in Nebraska have greenhouses, but many only use those greenhouses for starting perennials or growing holiday plants. Some even lie fallow. This is a missed opportunity for Nebraska’s kids.

This why we’re so excited to be awarded a grant from the Blooming Prairie Foundation for our Greenhouse-Grown Organic Entrepreneurs project! We can’t wait to partner with schools and get to work. 

Bancroft-Rosalie: Farm to School Capitalizes on School’s Rural Setting

March Madness was in full swing at Bancroft-Rosalie Community School this year. The school, located in Bancroft, Nebraska, participates in the Center’s pilot Farm to School program. Naturally, there was a Farm to School twist on their brand of March Madness.

Each year, kindergarten through 4th grade students choose their favorite breakfast menu item and invite guests to eat at school. This year’s competition was called “Pennies for Produce.”

Farm to School Lessons Learned: Better Food, Same Cost

Hemingford, Nebraska, public schools recently transitioned from a “warm and serve” to a “made from scratch” school lunch.
 
The change has been a hit with students and will likely have a positive impact on the school’s budget. School nurse Judy Stewart, a driving force behind the change, believes when final financial statements for kitchen operations come in, labor and food costs will be the same as before the transition, if not less.
 

Farm to School Continues to Build in Nebraska

“Healthy students learn better because they eat better,” stated Dr. John Skretta in Beatrice during the Center for Rural Affairs’ most recent Farm to School Regional Conference. Skretta, school administrator of Norris School District in Firth, NE, started off the conference on the Southeast Community College campus with a powerful keynote.

Dr. Skretta talked about the need for farm to school programs. He noted they take “all hands on deck,” from administrators to great food service staff, teachers, and parents. And it is well worth the integrated approach.

Hemingford: Better Food, Same Cost

Earlier we reported on the Hemingford, Nebraska, public schools transition from a “warm and serve” kitchen to a “made from scratch” operation. The spark for the move came when school nurse Judy Stewart was teaching the nutrition section of her health class.

The change has been a big hit at the school. It may surprise you to learn that Judy’s pretty sure it will have a positive return on the balance sheet as well.

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