Community Food News

Artist workshop in Santee draws beaders

A fun beading workshop was held at the Nebraska Indian Community College in Santee on April 5.

Beaders Deanna James and Emma Stumblingbear demonstrated different beading techniques, as well as shared patterns for beaded moccasins and earrings.

The Farmers Market Program, a joint effort of the Center for Rural Affairs and Nebraska Indian Community College, brought beading supplies so everyone could create something during the workshop, although many folks brought their own projects to work on.

Shop Local at the Christmas Bazaar

The annual Walthill Christmas Bazaar will be held on Dec. 1 at the Walthill Fire Hall, located on the main street of Walthill, Neb. The Bazaar offers unique, handmade jewelry, shawls and bead-work made by members of the Omaha Tribe, and a wide array of other gift ideas.

This is the third year for the Christmas Bazaar in Thurston County, and the second year it has been hosted in Walthill. The Bazaar will open at 10 a.m. on Thursday, Dec. 1, and runs until 6 p.m. Organizers will serve a lunch special, but, so far at least, the details of the lunch are being kept secret.

Plant alliums in the fall

Fall is the best time to plant alliums, a plant genus which includes garlic, shallots, chives, leeks and onions. These are some of my favorite vegetables, and are not only incredibly healthy, but impart flavor to any recipe.

Native crafts and products available this weekend

If you’re looking for a unique, interesting activity this weekend, we might have just the thing - the 2016 Holiday Fall and Winter Extravaganza! This event will be hosted by the Ohiya Casino near Niobrara, Neb., and will feature candles, floral arrangements, holiday decorations, yard art, paintings, quilts, blankets, baked goods, handmade crafts, jewelry, beadwork, other Native made products and much more!

Making Nebraska’s food system more resilient in the face of an uncertain climate

Ask anyone if they’ve noticed weather patterns becoming increasingly erratic over the last 20 years and the answer is usually a resounding “yes!”

Extreme precipitation events, prolonged periods of drought, and scorching summer temperatures are all on the rise in the United States and worldwide. In the Great Plains region, droughts, floods and rising temperatures are already cutting crop yields. These erratic weather patterns are projected to reduce agricultural yields and livestock productivity even further as we move into the next 40 years.

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