About the Center for Rural Affairs News

$665,000 more available in lending capital

Recently, we learned of a $665,000 grant awarded to our Rural Investment Corporation for lending capital. The Rural Investment Corporation is a subsidiary of the Center for Rural Affairs that is certified as a Community Development Financial Institution (CDFI). 

The award comes from the U.S. Department of Treasury CDFI Fund. This was our first ever application to the CDFI Fund for loan capital. We were among 303 CDFIs who were awarded $208.7 million to increase lending and investment activity in low-income and economically-distressed communities across the nation.

Staff spotlight: Eberle serves east central small businesses

The Center for Rural Affairs recently hired Craig Eberle, of Bradshaw, Nebraska, as a small business loan specialist.

Eberle’s role is to work with new and existing small businesses to help them develop business plans, obtain funding, and receive training.

“I look forward to working with small businesses; helping them either expand their existing business, or start a new business,” he said. “It’s very rewarding to work with individuals who live and work in rural Nebraska.”

Top 5 of 2017: Cora grew up in the middle of everywhere

Cora Fox, policy associate, joined our organization in May. In our second highest viewed post of 2017, Cora shares that she looks forward coming back to her roots to work with Midwestern farmers, and talks about growing up in rural Iowa. She works primarily on agricultural policy, and can answer questions on our farm bill work or anything regarding "Answering the Call: Veteran Farmers Conference" set for March 24, in Hastings, Nebraska. We are glad to have her on our team.

Staff member featured in 2018 Farmer’s Almanac

Center for Rural Affairs project organizer, Kirstin Bailey, is featured in The 2018 Old Farmer’s Almanac. Bailey was contacted to take part in their “Special Report: Faces of Farming,” a compilation of input from farmers and growers throughout America.

The answers Bailey and her fellow farmers provided spoke to both changes underfoot and timeless traditions.

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