Rural Health News

Increased access to clean drinking water could improve student health

Children spend a significant portion of their days in school for most of the calendar year, and public health advocates are concerned that too many are not drinking enough water, which can lead to a host of negative issues.

Jordan Rasmussen, policy manager for the Center for Rural Affairs, says insufficient water intake poses long-term health risks, and because dehydrated brains are not as sharp, children find it harder to stay focused in class.

Small-town clinic gets to the heart of hometown health care

Kristi Eggers was raised rural, and has always loved helping others. Little did she know those two aspects of her life would forge a lifelong career and passion for rural health care.

Born and raised in Oklahoma, Kristi’s love of rural began on the farm where she grew up. As a teenager, Kristi volunteered after school each day as a candy striper at her local hospital, a position which sparked her interest in the medical field.

Implement Medicaid expansion now for the benefit of Nebraskans

On Oct. 29, the Nebraska Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS) will begin hosting public hearings across the state to receive comments on the implementation of Medicaid expansion and the proposed 1115 waiver.

The public is invited to testify and/or submit written comments. Hearings are scheduled for Oct. 29 in Scottsbluff, Oct. 30 in Kearney, Nov. 7 in Norfolk, and Nov. 12 in Omaha.

State line determines access to health care coverage

The 102nd meridian and 41st parallel separate Colorado and Nebraska. When crossing this artificial barrier, you will not see a big change in the landscape, people, or towns. However arbitrary these borders may be, your place on either side can greatly change your access to one important service: Medicaid.

No Medicaid, no normalcy for the Lockwoods

​Deb and Curtis Lockwood have lived and worked in the Fremont area for most of their lives. They raised children, welcomed grandchildren, and began to plan for a comfortable retirement. As far as anyone could see, they were living the American dream.

When Medicaid expanded in late 2018, the Lockwoods did not believe they would need it. After one unexpected injury and a bureaucratic nightmare, today, they find themselves waiting for coverage they desperately need.

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