Farm and Food News

New Grasslands Conservation Opportunity Available for Interested Landowners

A new type of carbon credit program designed for long-term conservation initiatives such as conservation easements on grasslands is beginning to enroll landowners this year. The goal of this effort is to develop a pilot project designed to conserve grasslands and reduce potential greenhouse gas emissions from land conversion. The program could potentially pay landowners who are avoiding crop cultivation activities in concert with easement activity.

The United States has lost grasslands to cropland at accelerated rates in recent years. This conversion can lead to a number of environmental issues including loss of habitat, soil erosion, water pollution, and release of greenhouse gases. By maintaining grasslands, landowners can enhance wildlife habitat, improve watershed health, and prevent the release of carbon into the atmosphere.

Old Farmer’s Almanac Seeks 21st Century Stories

How would you like a free copy of The 2018 Old Farmer’s Almanac ?

The Old Farmer's Almanac has been a resource to farmers and gardeners since 1792, with seasonal advice, planting tips and practices, and an array of helpful and entertaining matter in every annual edition.

The writers at the almanac are looking to introduce readers across the U.S. and Canada to 21st century farmers and are looking for farmers to be a part of this project! 

If It Were Easy, Everyone Would Be Doing It

“If it were easy, everyone would be doing it.” That's what my father, Bill Greeley, a rancher from Imperial, Nebraska, had to say after blizzard Selene foiled his plans of swiftly transporting newly acquired cows home from the Ogallala Livestock Market.

The storm hit just as he left the sale barn, the trailer filled with pregnant cows. Bill had hoped to get the cattle home before the storm got worse. An hour and 30 minutes later, he had only made it 19 miles down the road to the small town of Grant.

Farm Girl Journal Captures the Joy of Growing up on a Farm

Living in rural and small-town America is not a challenge, or a burden. I love living in a small town, having the ability to know my neighbors, and a genuine feeling of connectedness to the land and natural world. I can look out of my window at our garden, our flowers, the birds (and squirrels) at our birdfeeder. If that isn’t enough, in two minutes I can be in the countryside.

Beel Ranch: Conservation Profile

The Beel brothers are third-generation stewards of their family ranch located on the Brown and Cherry County line in the Nebraska Sandhills. Started in 1937 by Henry O. Beel, ranch records reveal conservation practices were an early concern: soil and water planning, water placement, rotational grazing, and planting of tree groves began in the 1940s. Today conservation and range management continue to play a central role at the Beel Ranch.

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