Farm and Food News

Rural Rockstar: Linda Kleinschmit a sustainable agriculture hero

In acknowledging her decades of leadership and service to sustainable agriculture, USDA has recognized Nebraska farmer Linda Kleinschmit as a NCR-SARE Hero.

Linda is a former Center for Rural Affairs Advisory Board member. She and her husband Martin, a former Center staff member, farm 365 acres of organic crops and livestock near Hartington, Neb. 

Women circle around sustainable farming

Since April, the Center, along with a small group of women farmer leaders, has co-led the first two in a series of Women Farmer Learning Circles on sustainable farming in a changing climate. Participating women are considered the “experts” on their own production, farmland, and conservation needs, and are encouraged to speak about their own experiences and goals rather than passively listen to a professional in a traditional lecture format. This format builds knowledge, confidence, and community around topics the group is most interested in exploring.

World-Class Vinegar in a town of 150

George Johnson makes world class vinegar in the small town of Cody, Neb. George’s story is a powerful example of how the values that our work stands on can lead to vibrant small towns.

I was lucky enough to visit George and his wife Karen on a recent trip through the Nebraska Sandhills. I stopped over for con­versation and lunch in the com­munity of 150 people they call home.

New Grasslands Conservation Opportunity Available for Interested Landowners

A new type of carbon credit program designed for long-term conservation initiatives such as conservation easements on grasslands is beginning to enroll landowners this year. The goal of this effort is to develop a pilot project designed to conserve grasslands and reduce potential greenhouse gas emissions from land conversion. The program could potentially pay landowners who are avoiding crop cultivation activities in concert with easement activity.

The United States has lost grasslands to cropland at accelerated rates in recent years. This conversion can lead to a number of environmental issues including loss of habitat, soil erosion, water pollution, and release of greenhouse gases. By maintaining grasslands, landowners can enhance wildlife habitat, improve watershed health, and prevent the release of carbon into the atmosphere.

Pages

Get the Newsletter