Environment

Land, air, water, and the ability to grow food is essential for all communities. Rural communities, however, have an especially intimate connection and are disproportionately impacted when the environment is harmed. Farm and community leaders need a voice in discussions about the best ways to foster a healthy environment.

Conservation, practical on-farm efforts, agricultural innovation, a clean energy economy, energy efficiency, and strong regulations on carbon pollution are among common-sense solutions. These efforts also set a conscious course to ensure clean air and water, resilient and sustainable food production, and health for future generations.

We are called on to be good stewards. It’s time to protect the places we call home, the resources we depend upon, and the way of life we cherish.

Environment Notes

 

Rural Electrification 2.0: The Transition to a Clean Energy Economy

Rural America faces a conundrum in the expanding development in renewable energy. Many rural areas in the country are providing the infrastructure for a clean energy future through transmission lines, wind turbines, and utility-scale solar. But, much of the power itself is not used locally in rural communities. Many rural communities are dependent on the energy resource mix of their rural electric cooperative. Nationally, these cooperatives derive 67 percent of their energy from fossil fuels.

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Take the Next Step NPPD!

The coal-fired power plant north of Hallam, Nebraska, Sheldon Station, will undergo a partial transition from coal to an exciting and innovative power generation technology. Nebraska Public Power District (NPPD), which owns and operates the plant, plans to replace one of the existing coal-fired boilers at Sheldon Station plant with one that uses hydrogen fuel. This is great but it’s a ‘job half-done.’

Cover crops can help farmers address climate change with Legislature’s support

I am writing to express alarm about rapid climate change. Scientists agree that climate change is occurring fast. The facts are overwhelming. Consequently, most mainstream Christian denominations, such as, Episcopal, Lutheran, Catholic, Eastern Orthodox, Presbyterian, Methodist, and United Church of Christ, and other religions, are warning about carbon dioxide emissions changing our climate.