Environment

Rural communities have an abundance of natural resources and often have an intimate connection to them, whether economic or cultural. Elevating the voices of rural people in discussions about their environment is a crucial component of the work we do at the Center for Rural Affairs. Any discussion about the best ways to foster a healthy environment must include a robust public dialogue that involves rural Americans in decisions about their future.

Advocating for strategies to address climate change, facilitate the adoption of clean energy projects, and encourage the conservation of our soil and water resources are just a few ways we help promote stewardship in rural communities. These efforts also set a conscious course to ensure clean air and water, resilient and sustainable food production, and health for future generations.

We are called on to be good stewards of our environment, and we advocate for changes to protect the places we call home, the resources we depend upon, and the way of life we cherish. Empowering rural communities positions them to leave behind a natural legacy that can be enjoyed for generations to come.

Environment Notes

 

Rural Electrification 2.0: The Transition to a Clean Energy Economy

Rural America faces a conundrum in the expanding development in renewable energy. Many rural areas in the country are providing the infrastructure for a clean energy future through transmission lines, wind turbines, and utility-scale solar. But, much of the power itself is not used locally in rural communities. Many rural communities are dependent on the energy resource mix of their rural electric cooperative. Nationally, these cooperatives derive 67 percent of their energy from fossil fuels.

File attachments: 

Take the Next Step NPPD!

The coal-fired power plant north of Hallam, Nebraska, Sheldon Station, will undergo a partial transition from coal to an exciting and innovative power generation technology. Nebraska Public Power District (NPPD), which owns and operates the plant, plans to replace one of the existing coal-fired boilers at Sheldon Station plant with one that uses hydrogen fuel. This is great but it’s a ‘job half-done.’

Iowans find common ground on climate change

2019 is on track to be the second or third warmest year on record at a time when some Iowa farmers still are dealing with extreme spring flooding and five years of falling income. 

A changing climate also fuels the pressure, but preventive measures are an option for many.