Your Stories

Rural Rockstars: Micro Brewery Owners Receive Entrepreneur of the Year Award

Three young entrepreneurs from McCook, Nebraska, were recognized as the Center for Rural Affairs Entrepreneurs of the Year. Tyler Ray Loop, Tyler Sue Loop, and Adam Siegfried own and operate Loop Brewing Company in McCook.

This thriving business exemplifies the entrepreneurial spirit that defines and is so crucial to the future prosperity of our nation’s rural communities. The brewpub serves specialty craft beer, brick oven pizza, and much more.

Rural Rockstar: Dan Hromas, Veteran Beginning Farmer, Receives Sustainable Agriculture Award

Dan Hromas of York, Nebraska, is the recipient of the Center for Rural Affairs’ 2014 Bob Steffen Pioneer Award. It honors his integrity, leadership, and extraordinary efforts in sustainable agriculture.

This beginning farmer exemplifies service to his community of veterans and neighbors. He returned from duty after 20 years of service in the military, and decided he wanted to farm and work for himself. But he couldn’t afford land or cows, so he started with chickens.

Rural Rockstar: Jerry Peckumn Honored for His Advocacy and Citizenship

Jerry Peckum, who farms near Jefferson, Iowa, is the recipient of the Center for Rural Affairs Citizenship Award. The award goes to someone who actively participates in the democratic process for creating public policy, and who works closely with us to advance public policies that strengthen family farms, ranches, and rural communities.

Moving from Coal to Clean in Hallam, Nebraska

Sheldon Station is an aging coal-fired power plant constructed in 1958 near Hallam, Nebraska. Sheldon Station is the biggest polluter in Lancaster County, and changing environmental regulations make continuing operations at Sheldon Station uneconomical. Sheldon Station's 80 dedicated employees deserve a transition plan for job creation and economic growth after the plant is retired.

Warm Drive, Beautiful Lights!

The days leading up to Christmas for my family centered around lights. Flashlights, as we fed livestock on winter evenings when going outside after five meant going out in the dark. Headlights, as we stood at the end of our driveway in pre-dawn hours, awaiting the warmth found on the school bus. Starlight, as we looked up at bright, twinkling stars in the blackness of a clear winter sky, untainted by city lights.

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