Get the Newsletter

 

Recent posts by Virginia Meyer

From Coal to Clean Energy

Hallam, Nebraska, received some good news this week. Volkswind USA Inc., an international wind developer, applied for permits to build 54 wind turbines in Lancaster and Gage counties.  According to a recent Lincoln Journal Star article, Volkswind says the wind farm would provide more than 200 jobs during construction, additional full-time operating jobs and about $700,000 in total property tax benefits annually to both counties. Volkswind is submitting proposals to Lincoln Electric System (LES), which is looking to add up to 100 megawatts of wind energy to their portfolio.

Hispanic Population Gains Offset Rural Out-Migration, Keep Small Towns Bustling

My town, Fremont, Nebraska, population 26,000, has an aging population. We’re no different from many small and midsized towns across rural America. By 2017, 31% of Fremont’s residents are projected to be 55 or older.

A new population of Latino immigrants has been moving to the quiet town since the late 1970s. In 1990 there were only 223 Latinos in Dodge County, where Fremont is the county seat. That number increased to approximately 1,400 in 2000 and more than 2,500 in 2012.

Funding Available for Small Business Investments in Renewable Energy

Hey small business owners, your creativity, passion, and drive helped you launch a business in your small town. Investing in renewable energy can help propel your business to the next level.

Installing wind or solar energy systems can cut down on your energy bill and attract new customers who appreciate a product produced with renewable energy. Grants for such projects are now available through the Rural Energy for America Program (REAP).

Moving from Coal to Clean in Hallam, Nebraska

Sheldon Station is an aging coal-fired power plant constructed in 1958 near Hallam, Nebraska. Sheldon Station is the biggest polluter in Lancaster County, and changing environmental regulations make continuing operations at Sheldon Station uneconomical. Sheldon Station's 80 dedicated employees deserve a transition plan for job creation and economic growth after the plant is retired.

Pages