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Recent posts by Jordan Rasmussen

Paying more and receiving less health care coverage does not make sense for rural America

The Senate’s current draft of the Better Care Reconciliation Act, the plan to repeal the Affordable Care Act, strikes directly at the vulnerabilities of health care in rural America. For rural populations that tend to be older, poorer, and have more health concerns, this plan would implement even greater barriers to health care access.

Answering the Call: A conference for veteran farmers

Have you seen the news? The Center for Rural Affairs is hosting a conference for veteran farmers.

“Answering the Call: Veteran Farmer Conference” is on Thursday, June 22, at the Seward Civic Center in Seward, Nebraska, starting at 8 a.m. This free conference is sponsored by the Center for Rural Affairs and Legal Aid of Nebraska.

Why a veteran farmer conference?

We want to help veterans run successful farming operations, whether they’re just starting out or have been doing this for decades.

Unlikely partners work toward common sense tax solution

When Gov. Ricketts’ tax cut plans emerged at the beginning of the Nebraska legislative session, they appeared to set the stage for a classic rural-urban debate. The rural voice would coalesce around the need for agricultural land property tax relief while the more urban groups would call for their own form of property tax relief and the touted income tax cut.

Yet as the combined income and property tax cut bill known as LB 461 emerged from committee and to the floor for debate, there was a uniquely unified voice among constituent groups.

Exploring growing taxes on Nebraska farms

How does Nebraska’s tax burden balance out?

A recent report from the Center for Rural Affairs explores the tax burden in 13 Nebraska counties. Using data from the Nebraska Department of Revenue, the Center compared income, property, and agricultural property tax trends over a 10-year period. While income tax revenue remained steady, there was a dynamic and growing shift of Nebraska’s tax burden onto agricultural property taxpayers.

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