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Recent posts by Jon Bailey

3 Factors Influence People’s Decision to Move

One of the main arguments offered by those who would cut taxes in ways that savage pubic goods like schools and infrastructure is that people vote with their feet – they migrate to states with low or no state and local taxes.  Turns out this is not true. Not even a little true. 

Recent research by the Center on Budget and Policy Priorities shows taxes have little if any effect on Americans’ migration. 

Center Supports Campaign to Raise the Minimum Wage

We are proud to announce our support for the Nebraskans for Better Wages campaign. It seeks to place a measure on the 2015 ballot to gradually increase the state’s minimum wage from the current $7.25 per hour (the federal minimum wage) to $9.00 per hour by January 1, 2016.

This is not a problem confined to young people. The average minimum wage worker is 35, and 88% are at least 20 years old.

Medicaid Expansion Life and Death Issue

Charlene Dill was a 33 year old mother of three in Orlando, Florida. She worked three jobs to support her family. She had a treatable heart condition. Charlene also fell into the “coverage gap” – she made too much money (a whole $9,000 per year) to qualify for Medicaid in Florida, too little to qualify for a subsidy to purchase insurance on the new health insurance marketplaces, and none of her jobs provided health insurance. She was uninsured. Florida decided not to expand their Medicaid program as allowed under the Affordable Care Act to cover low-income working people like Ms. Dill.

A Tale of Two States: Insurance Premiums in Border Counties of Nebraska and Iowa

Nebraska’s decision not to participate in Medicaid expansion has contributed to higher health insurance premiums compared to Iowa. Nebraska’s decision not to expand Medicaid changed its health insurance marketplace pool. That resulted in higher health insurance premiums for most Nebraskans. When age and health plan level are combined, the annual cost difference can be significant. For example, a hypothetical 60 year old Nebraska couple would pay nearly $500 more annually for a Bronze plan.

Download the report as a pdf below!

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