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Recent posts by Jon Bailey

Saving Families from the Financial Ledge: Medicaid Expansion in Nebraska

This brief is part of a series to examine findings of a report on Medicaid Expansion in Nebraska, the implication on LB 472, and the significance to rural Nebraska. This brief examines basic economic and income issues for all Nebraskans connected to expanding Medicaid.

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Saving Families from the Financial Ledge: Medicaid Expansion in Nebraska

For modest-income families in Nebraska expanding Medicaid is a no-brainer. Not only does it provide access to needed health insurance and health care, it provides a host of positive economic benefits.
 
According to a recent report from Dr. Allan Jenkins and Dr. Ron Konecny of the University of Nebraska at Kearney, expanding Medicaid in Nebraska would result in an increase of $1,100 in discretionary income per enrollee in an expanded Medicaid program, or a total of $88 million statewide.
 

For Pete's Sake

The Legislature recently voted to delay LB 472, the Medicaid Redesign Act, until the 2016 session. While the bill is still alive, this means another year without access to health insurance for up to 77,000 Nebraskans, another year of health consequences that inaction will demand of them, and another year our rural hospitals are in financial jeopardy.
 
What’s more discouraging is the absolute lack of a reasonable alternative plan to provide access to health insurance for these Nebraskans.
 

Nebraska’s Health Care System Can Handle LB 472

One of the arguments used against providing access to health insurance for modest-income, working Nebraskans through LB 472, the Medicaid Redesign Act, is that those newly eligible for health insurance would swamp our health care system. In fact, the exact opposite is true.

Medicaid Expansion Will Save Lives

Nebraska’s LB 472, the Medicaid Redesign Act, would provide health insurance coverage through the state’s Medicaid program to those in the coverage gap. People fall into the gap when they make too much income to qualify for traditional Medicaid coverage but not enough to qualify for premium assistance tax credits through the health insurance marketplace, and they lack access to employer-provided insurance.

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