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Recent posts by Johnathan Hladik

Giving Landowners the Power

High-voltage transmission lines are needed to meet evolving energy needs. Engineers estimate that seven billion dollars of investment is required to properly maintain and update the electric grid.
 
But building lines isn’t easy.  Developers will need to acquire thousands of acres of land from landowners across the country.  
 

Civic Duty Requires More

Democracy is key to the American experience. You have the right to vote, and most of you exercise that right. This gives us equal say when choosing the persons to best represent our interests.
 
For many of us, voting is more than a right. It’s a duty. And after weeks (or was it months?) of nonstop television ads, radio clips, and mailings, we were happy get it over with. That duty has been fulfilled.
 
It’s now time to kick back and relax until 2016, right?
 

Special Series: Primer on Renewable Energy and Transmission

Writer Loren Flaugh, a longtime friend of the Center, is uniquely interested in energy. Living in Central Iowa, a region heavily committed to renewables, he’s had no shortage of inspiration. Loren enjoys a front-row seat as his region reaps the benefits of renewable energy investment.

It wasn’t long ago that he realized most of these benefits – clean air, low rates, and local economic development – depend on infrastructure that moves that energy from where it’s produced to where it’s needed most.

Carbon Pollution Standards Open Options for Renewable Energy

Last month the Center for Rural Affairs filed official comments to the Environmental Protection Agency in support of proposed New Source Performance Standards. This rule creates first-ever limits on the amount of carbon pollution emitted by coal-fired power plants.

As the name implies, these standards apply only to new power plants, those that haven’t yet been built. A similar rule written exclusively for existing power plants will be released later this summer.

We Are Rural: Energy

This year we grew. From coal to clean energy, we are working to help small towns and rural communities engage in clean energy topics. We listened to your feedback – from the Midwest to the coasts – to help guide our growing portfolio.

You told us eminent domain matters in new energy projects. So we explored what can be done to avoid it. And we also came up with creative ways to make sure landowners get their fair share when new transmission projects are built.

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