Get the Newsletter

 

Recent posts by Johnathan Hladik

A neighborly dispute: adverse possession bill could mend fences in Nebraska

Joe and Carol Schmieding’s property included a waterway and a driveway running along its east side.

Land east of the parcel sold in 2001. The exact location of the property line was not determined, so the couple and their new neighbors agreed to share the driveway.

Five years later, Joe discovered a survey marker that marked the boundary line. However, when Joe prepared to modify the driveway and waterway in 2010, the neigh­bors sued for adverse possession.

Tax credits should help the distressed

The most effective and desirable economic development strategy for many rural communities is small entrepreneurship. Small businesses are especially important today, as opportunities to attract large employers to remote rural areas diminish.

For the past decade, the Nebraska Advantage Microenterprise Tax Credit has played an essential role in helping these businesses get started. Passed in 2005, the act provides tax credits to applicants for creating or expanding microbusinesses that contribute to the revitalization of economically distressed areas.

A neighborly dispute: adverse possession bill could mend fences in Nebraska

Farmers Joe and Carol Schmieding purchased land in Seward County in 1987, land that included a driveway and waterway that spanned forty acres. However, the boundary line was not clearly marked, and neighbors used this driveway for farming purposes disputing ownership of this parcel.

In 2006, Joe discovered a survey marker which established the true boundary line. This marker clarified that the disputed parcel was part of the Schmieding property.

Unicameral Update - Feb. 7

Welcome back to the Center for Rural Affairs Unicameral Update. Today is day 24. As a reminder, the 2017 session is a “long” session – legally mandated to be 90 days in length. The legislature opened on Jan. 4, 2017, and is tentatively scheduled to adjourn on June 2, 2017.

The deadline for bill introduction was Jan. 18. Each bill introduced will be heard in one of 14 standing committees. Committee hearings begin in mid-January and last through early March.

Pages