Get the Newsletter

 

Recent posts by Becky Keim

Pollinators are essential for crops

The majority of Americans pay little attention to pollinators – bees, butterflies, wasps, moths and other insects.

However, without pollinators, many crops would not grow. A large variety of fruits and vegetables would become scarce or incredibly expensive, and the cost of other products, including clothing (as cotton is bee-pollinated), would be impacted.

BeeCheck can save valuable pollinators

The majority of Americans pay little attention to pollinators – bees, butterflies, wasps, moths, and other insects – in their day-to-day activities. However, without pollinators, many crops simply would not grow. A large variety of fruits and vegetables would become scarce or incredibly expensive, and the cost of other products, including clothing (as cotton is bee-pollinated), would also be impacted.

Practical Guide to Common Sandhills Conservation Practices now available

The Sandhills of Nebraska is the largest sand dune formation in the Western Hemisphere, spanning almost 20,000 square miles. In addition to its geological importance, the region also serves as home to a significant community of birds and various species at risk, and provides grazing habitat for cattle. These factors create a unique opportunity for conservation efforts designed to address priority resource concerns on area ranches while simultaneously delivering environmental and economic benefits.

Biologically diverse ranch requires a conservation mindset

Located near the headwaters of the Elkhorn River, the Stewart Hereford Ranch sits on 13,000 acres in the Sandhills outside of Newport, Neb. The ranch is owned by Roy and June Stewart and their son and daughter-in-law, Jay and Kaye Stewart, who also manage the operation.

The ranch includes a biologically diverse mix of sub-irrigated meadows and sandhill pastures, which require a conservation mindset, according to its owners.

Making Nebraska’s food system more resilient in the face of an uncertain climate

Ask anyone if they’ve noticed weather patterns becoming increasingly erratic over the last 20 years and the answer is usually a resounding “yes!”

Extreme precipitation events, prolonged periods of drought, and scorching summer temperatures are all on the rise in the United States and worldwide. In the Great Plains region, droughts, floods and rising temperatures are already cutting crop yields. These erratic weather patterns are projected to reduce agricultural yields and livestock productivity even further as we move into the next 40 years.

Pages