REAP

Our Rural Enterprise Assistance Project is committed to strengthening rural communities through small, self-employed business development. We offer four essential services: financing (micro loans), business training, technical assistance, and networking.

Call on REAP when you are thinking of starting a small business or if you already operate a small business in Nebraska. You can find your nearest REAP business specialist here. Through REAP you can create a business plan, research potential markets and marketing ideas, discuss management issues with experienced business specialists, and apply for a small business loan.

Started in 1990, REAP has provided services to numerous micro/small businesses throughout Nebraska. (A micro business is defined as one with 10 or fewer employees.) We've placed over $10 million in loans and leveraged over $17 million in additional funds from other sources.

REAP is a proud member of the Nebraska Small Business Collaborative, extending microenterprise businesses technical assistance and micro-loans in all distressed areas of Nebraska. You can learn more about REAP here.

REAP Notes

 

Small Businesses in Rural Nebraska: Their Needs and Thoughts

Our 4th biennial assessment of rural small business trends, needs, and concerns showed some notable findings. Overall hiring and job creation activity was up. Participation of Latino-owned businesses in the survey increased dramatically.
 
Latino-owned businesses were more likely to be owned and operated by women. The owners were, on average, considerably younger than the overall sampling group. These trends create unique business needs and exciting development opportunities.
 

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Rural Small Business Hiring on the Rise

Our new assessment of rural small business trends, needs, and concerns in Nebraska shows some promising data. Most notable was the overall increase in hiring and job creation activity. The dramatic rise in Latino-owned businesses participating in the survey was also encouraging.

Interesting demographic trends among Latino business owners came to light. The owners were, on average, considerably younger than the overall sampling group. Also, business owners were more likely to be women. These trends create unique business needs and exciting development opportunities.

Statistics Show Challenges Micro Businesses Face

Last May, the Center's REAP Hispanic Business Specialist Imelda Catalan joined me at the Association for Enterprise Opportunity (AEO) Conference in New Orleans. AEO is the nation’s leading voice for micro enterprise development, serving the needs of micro entrepreneurs who lack access to traditional sources of business education or capital. Several important items caught our attention. We learned that 8,000 micro businesses get declined by financial institutions daily in the United States.