REAP Notes

 

The Sunflower State – Assessing Our Business Garden

To ensure business owners are offered the products and services they need, it is imperative to simply ask. Business needs change as the economy shifts and technology modernizes, and entrepreneurs fluctuate in interests, financial situations, and energy levels. As citizens, large business owners, and business lenders and providers, we need to pay attention to those needs and assist if we want our downtowns, communities, and local economies to thrive.

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Women’s Business Center Kicks off 16th year

Rural Enterprise Assistance Project (REAP) Women’s Business Center is kicking off its 16th year as a program of the Center for Rural Affairs.

We continue to partner with local organizations to offer learning opportunities throughout the state.

Recently, “Online Marketing Strategies” sessions were held in Hebron and Central City, with sessions scheduled for Plattsmouth and Wood River in the near future.

“Facebook for Business” was offered in Central City, and “Top Ten LinkedIn Tips” was held in Lincoln in collaboration with Community Development Resources.

Staff spotlight: Eberle serves east central small businesses

The Center for Rural Affairs recently hired Craig Eberle, of Bradshaw, Nebraska, as a small business loan specialist.

Eberle’s role is to work with new and existing small businesses to help them develop business plans, obtain funding, and receive training.

“I look forward to working with small businesses; helping them either expand their existing business, or start a new business,” he said. “It’s very rewarding to work with individuals who live and work in rural Nebraska.”

Small business REAPs benefits by helping the environment in a stylish way

“What to wear?” is every woman’s daily dilemma, and a problem Refined Boutique and Reclaimed Brands, in North Platte, Nebraska, is able to solve.

In 2010, Missy Couse and her husband considered starting a business.

She asked him if it made a difference what they sold. His response was, “no.” However, when she mentioned a boutique, she could tell he was skeptical. He let her run with it.

Like most businesses, the boutique started out very small, in a side space of a salon, and expanded slowly.