News

Online Marketing Sessions held across the state

The Women's Business Center continues to offer Online Marketing Strategies sessions across the state. 

In Hartington (pictured), participants discussed building online relationships using websites, email marketing and social media. 

Think beyond biases to create welcoming communities

We all discriminate.

It does not matter if you are a person of color or not, female or male, young or old, gay or straight. We all discriminate.

I’m not talking about intentional discrimination, like denying housing based on gender or the color of skin. I’m talking about nonconscious discrimination that is caused by the way our brains work; and we are completely unaware.

New Year’s resolution: be more efficient and increase capacity

The New Year’s resolution is a common tradition around the world. In the new year, many of us look to our past experiences and strive to better ourselves.

The Latino Business Center is coming into the new year following a very successful 2016. In the fourth quarter of 2016 alone, we placed 22 loans to Latino business owners totaling $342,100. We trained 214 individuals through workshops and roundtables across the state, and provided counseling to 94 clients on 394 occasions. That’s a lot of holiday season cheer.

Rural communities and schools are too reliant on property taxes

The Center for Rural Affairs agrees that property taxes are too high and local schools and government entities are too reliant on property taxes. This reliance upon property taxes for education and local government demands even the most comprehensive property tax relief plan receive careful scrutiny as these institutions underpin these existence of rural communities. While we recognize farmers and ranchers often bear the greatest burden, our mission is to support policy that builds strong rural communities and provides opportunity for all rural people.

From the desk of the Executive Director: What if the workers owned it?

The sale and closure of a midsize manufacturing plant in a nearby small town got me thinking.

The business was home-grown, but no one in the next generation was interested in taking the helm. The owners were ready to retire, and they needed to sell the business. 

The buyer was from out of state. The business was profitable, but the new owner had no ties to the local community. 

You know how this ends. 

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