Climate News

The Science Behind Planet Earth’s Atmosphere

Summer is hotter than winter, right? Ever wonder why summer is warmer than winter, and why Phoenix is hotter than Fargo? The answer to both of these questions, of course, has to do with how much heat is coming into the atmosphere, and how much is going out.

The sun’s rays are much more directly overhead in the summer because our side of the Earth is pointed towards the sun and less directly overhead in the winter. Likewise, the sun’s rays in Phoenix are more direct over a longer part of the year, so it is warmer than Fargo.

Testimony on Limiting Carbon Pollution Drawn from Rural People and Stories

I traveled to Denver in late July to testify at a public hearing on the Environmental Protection Agency’s carbon pollution rule. The rule will rein in carbon pollution and curb climate change. I brought your stories – the stories of rural people we know to the hearing.

Stories from people like Matt Russell, a 5th generation farmer from Iowa who feels he’s already experiencing the effects of climate change. He’s worried we won’t be able to meet the needs of a growing population if the agricultural systems we have in place now are no longer viable with a changing climate.

People in 4 States Discuss Climate and Agriculture

Over the past three months, we’ve heard many of you speak your thoughts on climate and agriculture. You have shared common-sense ideas to make rural America more adaptable and resilient in an era of more extreme weather and climate changes – on your farms, in your businesses, and in your communities. You care about conservation and good stewardship, and you’ve found that renewable energy is an economically viable solution.

Rural Voices for Climate Change

On March 30, the Center for Rural Affairs co-hosted an agriculture and climate discussion panel with Iowa Interfaith Power and Light, University of Northern Iowa’s Center for Energy and Environmental Education, Bethesda Lutheran Church, and Citizens Climate Lobby. This event featured perspectives from faith, agricultural, and scientific communities. It offered a space for frank conversation about the impacts of a changing climate, and our responsibility to be good stewards.

New Year, New Common Sense Approach to Climate Change

Our nation spent nearly $7 billion responding to extreme weather in 2013. Events that endanger livelihoods nationally, and especially in rural and small town America. These destructive storms, devastating droughts, dangerous flooding and paralyzing winter weather highlight the need for action. We must confront threats that climate shifts pose to rural communities, and the nation.

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