About the Center for Rural Affairs News

The Radical Center

Has the political center become the most radical place to work? In this time of piqued partisan rhetoric, it may be.

Working at the radical center does not mean that each of us should become a centrist. Nor does it mean that every answer will be found in the political center.

REAP loans almost 2 million dollars to small businesses in FY 2016

Fiscal Year 2016 was a record-setting year for Center for Rural Affairs’ Rural Enterprise Assistance Project (REAP). In 2016, we placed and leveraged over $2.9 million in loans and reached significant numbers of women and Latino entrepreneurs across Nebraska.

We are respected nationally as an outstanding microenterprise development program that serves rural entrepreneurs and small businesses in Nebraska. REAP is the largest rural microenterprise development program in the United States.

The complexity of agriculture guided Anna to the Center

I grew up in the mid-size town of Annapolis, Md. The similarities to rural life were few. I was outside early every morning, but it was to catch the school bus because my high school of 1,100 kids started at 7:17 a.m. We went swimming in the local creek in the summer, but it was in the calm spot between two well-trafficked bridges. So how, after a childhood primarily filled with reading indoors, did I come to love rural places and decide to work at the Center for Rural Affairs?

Will Congress reform federal crop insurance?

For over three decades, the Center for Rural Affairs has worked alongside farm and rural organizations, U.S. Senators and U.S. Representatives to reform federal farm subsidies. The impetus for those reform efforts has been the negative impacts unlimited farm subsidies have on beginning farmers, and on small and mid-sized family farms. We argue that when subsidies are unlimited in nature — with no cap on the amount of subsidies that the largest farms can receive — they provide the nation’s largest and wealthiest farms with additional financial resources to bid up land costs and drive their smaller neighbors out of farming.

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