Clean Energy News

Rural electric cooperatives help customers save money

We talk a lot about renewable energy at the Center for Rural Affairs. A big reason for that is because new renewable energy projects can provide a lot of benefits to rural communities – things like new tax revenue to fund local essential services like police or emergency services, direct payments to landowners, and bringing new jobs to small towns and rural areas. Those benefits are just the start – these projects also deliver cheap and clean renewable power for homes and small businesses.

New Transmission Key to Connecting Renewables

The Midwest and Great Plains is an area that has a bright future in renewable energy, especially in rural areas. Besides bringing cheap and clean energy to these states, renewable energy also brings new manufacturing and income sources that can reinvigorate local economies. But taking full advantage of the renewable potential in these states requires a way to transport energy from where it is generated to where it can be used by homes and businesses.

One goal for Bloomfield: 100 percent energy independence

Of the many lessons learned from the 2016 presidential election, this one cannot be ignored: Americans across the political spectrum are demanding an economic system that better distributes wealth and opportunity. With that demand ringing loud and clear, the next question becomes, “But how?” Local investment in and ownership of renewable energy is a partial answer to that question, especially for rural communities.

Consider these points:

For Brookings, sustainability is more than a buzzword

For the community of Brookings, S.D., sustainability is more than a buzzword touting efforts to be green. Guided by the Brookings Sustainability Council, the community has adopted a holistic perspective and plan of action toward sustainability.

Together with the members of the council, the city of Brookings recognizes that true sustainability rests in balancing of the economic, environmental and social equity needs of the community today while also keeping these same needs in sight for the residents of tomorrow.

Community engagement is key in clean energy development

When a room fills with 30 people, many driving more than an hour to be there on a beautiful fall evening in the midst of football playoffs, one can assume there is an important matter at hand. This was the case during a recent community energy conversation hosted by the Center for Rural Affairs in Valentine, Neb. On the table was the opportunity for open and candid conversation surrounding the energy future of the county and the state.

Pages

Get the Newsletter