Clean Energy News

Energy Project Builds Capacity and Economic Opportunity

Here at the Center for Rural Affairs we spend a lot of time working hard to create economic development opportunity in rural communities. When it comes to energy, we know this opportunity can be realized only if we further develop clean energy transmission infrastructure.

In the Dakotas, they’re doing just that. Big Stone South to Ellendale is a transmission line that will run from a new substation near Big Stone City, SD, to a proposed substation near Ellendale, ND.

Putting the Public Back in Public Power

This winter the energy team at the Center for Rural Affairs zigzagged across Nebraska. Renewable energy was on our minds. We sat down with renewable energy advocates and elected board members of the Nebraska Public Power District (NPPD). The board members represented most of our state.

Rural people who are concerned with the source of their power and Nebraska’s energy future came to the meetings to express their opinions. They discussed the benefits and road blocks of developing renewable energy in Nebraska.

Response to Reader Critique of Wind Energy Work

Several of you have criticized our work on wind energy. Specifically, our support for utility-scale wind and transmission lines to bring energy from rural areas to urban demand centers. Critics contend that puts us at odds with community wind energy. We view it differently. Here’s why.

Wind Energy Leading the Way in 2013

The U.S. has seen strong growth in the wind energy industry, and 2012 was a record year for the amount of installed capacity. Over 13,000 megawatts of capacity was installed last year according to the American Wind Energy Association, which brings the total capacity to 60,007 megawatts nationwide.

There’s More to It than Wind

Rural America is privy to some of the juicy plots of land for wind power production. It’s well known throughout the energy sphere that sprawling, unencumbered land masses are best suited for wind collection. And, fortunately enough, most of those land masses sit in countryside communities.

But that’s old news. We’ve all heard about wind power potential. And interestingly enough, that’s not the only place where rural America fits into the equation for nationwide sustainability.

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