Farm and Food News

Bancroft-Rosalie: Farm to School Capitalizes on School’s Rural Setting

March Madness was in full swing at Bancroft-Rosalie Community School this year. The school, located in Bancroft, Nebraska, participates in the Center’s pilot Farm to School program. Naturally, there was a Farm to School twist on their brand of March Madness.

Each year, kindergarten through 4th grade students choose their favorite breakfast menu item and invite guests to eat at school. This year’s competition was called “Pennies for Produce.”

It’s Not All About Organic

A growing number of people equate sustainable farming with organic farming. That is a mistake.

At the Center we look beyond labels and focus on our core values of stewardship, community, and ownership. We ask if a farming system protects the land, soil, and water. We ask if it encourages widespread ownership and how it impacts community.

Farm to School Continues to Build in Nebraska

“Healthy students learn better because they eat better,” stated Dr. John Skretta in Beatrice during the Center for Rural Affairs’ most recent Farm to School Regional Conference. Skretta, school administrator of Norris School District in Firth, NE, started off the conference on the Southeast Community College campus with a powerful keynote.

Dr. Skretta talked about the need for farm to school programs. He noted they take “all hands on deck,” from administrators to great food service staff, teachers, and parents. And it is well worth the integrated approach.

Hemingford: Better Food, Same Cost

Earlier we reported on the Hemingford, Nebraska, public schools transition from a “warm and serve” kitchen to a “made from scratch” operation. The spark for the move came when school nurse Judy Stewart was teaching the nutrition section of her health class.

The change has been a big hit at the school. It may surprise you to learn that Judy’s pretty sure it will have a positive return on the balance sheet as well.

Hemingford: Made from Scratch

It all started in Judy Stewart’s junior high health class. Judy, the school nurse at Hemingford public schools, was teaching the nutrition section. She heard lots of comments from the students about their wish for better, fresher food in the school cafeteria. Judy is not the first educator to hear students complain about their school cafeteria, but she recognized a valuable teaching moment and seized it.

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