Farm and Food News

Farm bill conversations: crop insurance

The Center for Rural Affairs farm bill team has been working hard to make sure you have up-to-date and important farm bill information. Over the past few weeks we have sent out information regarding our farm bill priorities. This week, we’re talking about crop insurance reform and how you can get involved by contacting your representatives.

Here are two things we’d like to see change with crop insurance through the 2018 farm bill:

Apply for value-added producer grants by January 2018, read about success stories

“Creating and marketing value-added products has the potential to significantly enhance our farm's profitability, but this is no easy task. Our value-added funds will help pay for processing, marketing, distribution, and sales of our pasture-raised chickens and eggs, as well as microgreens that we grow,” said Alex McKiernan, co-owner of Robinette Farms near Lincoln, Nebraska. The farm received a working capital grant in 2015.

Farm bill conversations: conservation

The Center for Rural Affairs wants to work with you to advocate for conservation in the upcoming 2018 farm bill!

Over the next few months we will share our farm bill priorities with you – beginning with conservation.

We need to protect funding and strengthen working lands conservation programs such as the Conservation Stewardship Program (CSP) and Environmental Quality Incentives Program (EQIP).

Ag-vocate talks conservation in Washington D.C.

Dustin Farnsworth flew to Washington D.C. this spring to speak with his lawmakers about the importance of conservation programs.

The farmer took part in a National Sustainable Agriculture Coalition (NSAC) “farmer fly-in,” joining growers from Oregon, Mississippi, North Dakota, Wisconsin, Alabama, and Georgia who talked important food and farm issues with their legislators.

Diversified Crops? There's an Insurance Program for That

An alternative to traditional farm insurance is catching the attention of the agricultural community in Iowa and throughout the Midwest. 

In farming - like investing - diversification is encouraged. But farmers who produce additional crops, like watermelons and sweet corn, have often found insurance to be lacking or nonexistent. 

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