Corporate Farming

A healthy and stable community depends not on the number of livestock being produced, but on the number of livestock producers living and working there. We work to create genuine opportunity for family farms and ranches.
Congratulations to voters who stood up for family farms & ranches.

Industrial agriculture has been defined, even by its proponents, as a system where the farm owner, the farm manager and the farm worker are different people. That's a dramatic change from the historic structure of agriculture, where the people who labor in farming also make the decisions and reap the profits of their work.

Corporate farming leads to closed markets where prices are fixed not by open, competitive bidding, but by negotiated contracts, and where producers who don't produce in large volumes are discriminated against in price or other terms of trade.

Check out our Corporate Farming Notes, below, to learn more about the consequences of industrialization and corporate farming on family farms and ranches.

Corporate Farming Notes

 

Want to have an impact on the livestock industry? There's still time to raise your voice

United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) published three long-awaited rules in December that would level the playing field for poultry and livestock producers. Officials will accept comments until March 24.

If you care about economic opportunity in rural America and if you care about our poultry and livestock producers, now is the time to raise your voice and submit a comment. This is a chance not to be missed.

Proposed rules

We described the provisions of the three rules previously on our blog.

USDA comment period extended for three Farmer Fair Practice Rules

There is still time to comment on three “Farmer Fair Practice Rules” introduced by the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) in December. The comment period has been extended to March 24.

The interim and proposed rules level the playing field and would create much needed protections for poultry and livestock producers. Provisions include:

Allowing producers to protect their rights without having to prove that a processor’s actions hurt the entire livestock industry.